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Rheumatic feverIs there any disease group more ’deserving’ of a place lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost at the neglected tropical disease table than the post streptococcal illnesses, glomerulonephritis and rheumatic fever?. These dropped off the radar of most high income countries in the second half of the 20th century but have continued to smoulder, largely unchecked, in low and middle income countries (LMICs). The burden lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost is frightening.

300 000 incident cases per year and 30 million prevalent cases, the damage from chronic carditis resulting, in so many, in heart failure and stroke.There are a number of approaches. Primary prevention (vaccination) remains a work in progress. Secondary prevention (prompt treatment) is largely dependent on diagnosis which depends on a positive throat swab or serological evidence in the form of the ASOT and ADB titres and this is where the complexities begin lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost.

Tertiary prevention, early diagnosis of heart disease by echo screening and prophylaxis has promise but is gestational. The range of population norms depends on exposure and threshold levels in one country might not lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost be applicable elsewhere inevitably resulting in false positive and false negative results. Okello et al establishes a range of ASOT levels in urban Uganda and shows much higher mean titres than other comparable populations.

Joshua Osowicki and Andrew Steer discuss the implications of these findings in the context of a multipronged approach to rheumatic fever during the wait for the long yearned-for group A streptococcal treatment. See pages 825 lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost and 813Febrile neutropaeniaOncological treatment is prolonged and draining for both a child and their family. A major contributor to the fatigue is the need for recurrent admissions for chemotherapy induced febrile neutropenia (FN).

Though evidence of benefit is scanty to non-existent, it is traditional to keep children in hospital on IV antibiotic treatment for several days irrespective lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost of culture results and clinical appearance. Sereveratne and colleagues assess the safety of a more flexible approach in a tertiary oncology centre, allowing discharge at 48 hours, even if culture positive as long as ‘wellness’ and social criteria were metIn total, 179 episodes of FN were reviewed from 47 patients. In 70% (125/179) of episodes, patients were discharged safely once 48 hours microbiology results were available, with only 5.6% (7/125) resulting in readmission in the 48 hours following discharge.

There were no deaths from sepsis lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost. This approach won’t work for all episodes of febrile neutropenia, but, probably applies to the majority and the differences to quality of life if adopted widely are hard to overstate. See page 881Infectious disease mortalityTrends in infectious disease mirror lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost changes in vaccination programmes, society and the environment, diagnostics and microbiological epidemiology.

Ferreras-Antolin examines Public Health England data over two eras, 2003 to 2005 and 2013 to 2015. In the latter period, there were 5088 death registrations recorded in children aged 28 days to <15 years in England and Wales (17.6 deaths/100 000 children annually) and, in the first 6897 (23.9/100 000). The incidence lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost rate ratio (IRR) of 0.74 (95% CI 0.71 to 0.77) fell significantly and the stories behind these data are revealing.

There is little doubt that PCV vaccination has played a role though, in this series, it is too early to assess the contribution of the (2015 launched) meningococcal B programme. The raw data also mask the rise of (the still non-treatment preventable) invasive group A streptococcal disease (one of the arguments for varicella vaccination) and the future role for Group B streptococcal immunisation. Influenza deaths were rare and, despite a reduction between the eras was not lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost a major explanator.

See page 857Fibre and constipationOne of the more entrenched tenets of child nutrition folklore is that of the association between fibre and constipation. In a re-analysis of data from the latest NICE review, information from the ALSPAC cohort (in which stool consistency pre-weaning was established) and monozygotic twin studies, Tappin persuasively argues (through triangulation analysis) that fibre is the result of and confounded by parental response to hard stool and is neither a cause of constipation or a treatment lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost. Laxation (as advocated) should be the first line and used early to prevent the all too familiar chronic issues with undertreatment.

Soiling. Loss of lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost self esteem. Poor mood and loss of appetite.

See page 864Drowning and autismDrowning is a major cause lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost of global child mortality, particularly in low and middle income country settings. Interventions such as fencing off access and swimming lessons have partially ameliorated the risk, but progress has been slow and awareness probably still the single best form of prophylaxis. Autistic children represent a high risk group due to their inherent communication and behavioural issues.

Peden assesses the association between autism and drowning in Australia from coronial certificates between 2002 lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost and 2018. Of the 667 cases of drowning among 0–19 year olds (with known history), 27 (4%) had an ASD diagnosis, relative risk 2.85 (95% CI 0.61 to 13.24). Children and adolescents with ASD were significantly lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost more likely to drown when compared with those without ASD.

If aged 5–9 years (44.4% of ASD cases. 13.3% of non ASD cases). In a lake or dam (25.9% vs 10.0%) and during winter (37.0% vs 13.1%) lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost.

These sobering figures are likely to be an underestimate as the diagnosis of ASD is often not made until the age of 5 years, past the highest drowning risk preschool group. See page 869.

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Abstract Thiamine is essential lasix 20mg oral tablet for the activity of several basics enzymes associated with energy metabolism in humans. Chronic alcohol use is associated with deficiency of thiamine along with other vitamins through several mechanisms. Several neuropsychiatric syndromes have been associated with thiamine deficiency in the context lasix 20mg oral tablet of alcohol use disorder including Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome, alcoholic cerebellar syndrome, alcoholic peripheral neuropathy, and possibly, Marchiafava–Bignami syndrome. High-dose thiamine replacement is suggested for these neuropsychiatric syndromes.Keywords.

Alcohol use disorder, alcoholic cerebellar syndrome, alcoholic peripheral neuropathy, Marchiafava–Bignami syndrome, thiamine, Wernicke–Korsakoff syndromeHow to cite lasix 20mg oral tablet this article:Praharaj SK, Munoli RN, Shenoy S, Udupa ST, Thomas LS. High-dose thiamine strategy in Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome and related thiamine deficiency conditions associated with alcohol use disorder. Indian J Psychiatry 2021;63:121-6How to cite this URL:Praharaj SK, Munoli RN, Shenoy S, lasix 20mg oral tablet Udupa ST, Thomas LS. High-dose thiamine strategy in Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome and related thiamine deficiency conditions associated with alcohol use disorder.

Indian J Psychiatry [serial online] 2021 lasix 20mg oral tablet [cited 2021 May 11];63:121-6. Available from. Https://www.indianjpsychiatry.org/text.asp?. 2021/63/2/121/313716 Introduction Thiamine is a water-soluble vitamin (B1) that plays a key role in the activity of several enzymes associated with energy metabolism.

Thiamine pyrophosphate (or diphosphate) is the active form that acts as a cofactor for enzymes. The daily dietary requirement of thiamine in adults is 1–2 mg and is dependent on carbohydrate intake.[1],[2] The requirement increases if basal metabolic rate is higher, for example, during alcohol withdrawal state. Dietary sources include pork (being the major source), meat, legume, vegetables, and enriched foods. The body can store between 30 and 50 mg of thiamine and is likely to get depleted within 4–6 weeks if the diet is deficient.[2] In those with alcohol-related liver damage, the ability to store thiamine is gradually reduced.[1],[2]Lower thiamine levels are found in 30%–80% of chronic alcohol users.[3] Thiamine deficiency occurs due to poor intake of vitamin-rich foods, impaired intestinal absorption, decreased storage capacity of liver, damage to the renal epithelial cells due to alcohol, leading to increased loss from the kidneys, and excessive loss associated with medical conditions.[2],[3] Furthermore, alcohol decreases the absorption of colonic bacterial thiamine, reduces the enzymatic activity of thiamine pyrophosphokinase, and thereby, reducing the amount of available thiamine pyrophosphate.[4] Since facilitated diffusion of thiamine into cells is dependent on a concentration gradient, reduced thiamine pyrophosphokinase activity further reduces thiamine uptake into cells.[4] Impaired utilization of thiamine is seen in certain conditions (e.g., hypomagnesemia) which are common in alcohol use disorder.[2],[3],[4] This narrative review discusses the neuropsychiatric syndromes associated with thiamine deficiency in the context of alcohol use disorder, and the treatment regimens advocated for these conditions.

A PubMed search supplemented with manual search was used to identify neuropsychiatric syndromes related to thiamine deficiency in alcohol use disorder patients. Neuropsychiatric Syndromes Associated With Thiamine Deficiency Wernicke–Korsakoff syndromeWernicke encephalopathy is associated with chronic alcohol use, and if not identified and treated early, could lead to permanent brain damage characterized by an amnestic syndrome known as Korsakoff syndrome. Inappropriate treatment of Wernicke encephalopathy with lower doses of thiamine can lead to high mortality rates (~20%) and Korsakoff syndrome in ~ 80% of patients (ranges from 56% to 84%).[5],[6] The classic triad of Wernicke includes oculomotor abnormalities, cerebellar dysfunction, and confusion. Wernicke lesions are found in 12.5% of brain samples of patients with alcohol dependence.[7] However, only 20%–30% of them had a clinical diagnosis of Wernicke encephalopathy antemortem.

It has been found that many patients develop Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) following repeated subclinical episodes of thiamine deficiency.[7] In an autopsy report of 97 chronic alcohol users, only16% had all the three “classical signs,” 29% had two signs, 37% presented with one sign, and 19% had none.[8] Mental status changes are the most prevalent sign (seen in 82% of the cases), followed by eye signs (in 29%) and ataxia (23%).[8] WKS should be suspected in persons with a history of alcohol use and presenting with signs of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, acute confusion, memory disturbance, unexplained hypotension, hypothermia, coma, or unconsciousness.[9] Operational criteria for the diagnosis of Wernicke encephalopathy have been proposed by Caine et al.[10] that requires two out of four features, i.e., (a) dietary deficiency (signs such as cheilitis, glossitis, and bleeding gums), (b) oculomotor abnormalities (nystagmus, opthalmoplegia, and diplopia), (c) cerebellar dysfunction (gait ataxia, nystagmus), and (d) either altered mental state (confusion) or mild memory impairment.As it is very difficult to clinically distinguish Wernicke encephalopathy from other associated conditions such as delirium tremens, hepatic encephalopathy, or head injury, it is prudent to have a lower threshold to diagnose this if any of the clinical signs is seen. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain scan during Wernicke encephalopathy shows mammillary body atrophy and enlarged third ventricle, lesions in the medial portions of thalami and mid brain and can be used to aid diagnosis.[11],[12] However, most clinical situations warrant treatment without waiting for neuroimaging report. The treatment suggestions in the guidelines vary widely. Furthermore, hardly any evidence-based recommendations exist on a more general use of thiamine as a preventative intervention in individuals with alcohol use disorder.[13] There are very few studies that have evaluated the dose and duration of thiamine for WKS, but higher doses may result in a greater response.[6],[14] With thiamine administration rapid improvement is seen in eye movement abnormalities (improve within days or weeks) and ataxia (may take months to recover), but the effects on memory, in particular, are unclear.[4],[14] Severe memory impairment is the core feature of Korsakoff syndrome.

Initial stages of the disease can present with confabulation, executive dysfunction, flattened affect, apathy, and poor insight.[15] Both the episodic and semantic memory are affected, whereas, procedural memory remains intact.[15]Thomson et al.[6] suggested the following should be treated with thiamine as they are at high risk for developing WKS. (1) all patients with any evidence of chronic alcohol misuse and any of the following. Acute confusion, decreased conscious level, ataxia, ophthalmoplegia, memory disturbance, and hypothermia with hypotension. (2) patients with delirium tremens may often also have Wernicke encephalopathy, therefore, all of these patients should be presumed to have Wernicke encephalopathy and treated, preferably as inpatients.

And (3) all hypoglycemic patients (who are treated with intravenous glucose) with evidence of chronic alcohol ingestion must be given intravenous thiamine immediately because of the risk of acutely precipitating Wernicke encephalopathy.Alcoholic cerebellar syndromeChronic alcohol use is associated with the degeneration of anterior superior vermis, leading to a clinical syndrome characterized by the subacute or chronic onset of gait ataxia and incoordination in legs, with relative sparing of upper limbs, speech, and oculomotor movements.[16] In severe cases, truncal ataxia, mild dysarthria, and incoordination of the upper limb is also found along with gait ataxia. Thiamine deficiency is considered to be the etiological factor,[17],[18] although direct toxic effects of alcohol may also contribute to this syndrome. One-third of patients with chronic use of alcohol have evidence of alcoholic cerebellar degeneration. However, population-based studies estimate prevalence to be 14.6%.[19] The effect of alcohol on the cerebellum is graded with the most severe deficits occurring in alcohol users with the longest duration and highest severity of use.

The diagnosis of cerebellar degeneration is largely clinical. MRI can be used to evaluate for vermian atrophy but is unnecessary.[20] Anterior portions of vermis are affected early, with involvement of posterior vermis and adjacent lateral hemispheres occurring late in the course could be used to differentiate alcoholic cerebellar degeneration from other conditions that cause more diffuse involvement.[21] The severity of cerebellar syndrome is more in the presence of WKS, thus could be related to thiamine deficiency.[22],[23] Therefore, this has been considered as a cerebellar presentation of WKS and should be treated in a similar way.[16] There are anecdotal evidence to suggest improvement in cerebellar syndrome with high-dose thiamine.[24]Alcoholic peripheral neuropathyPeripheral neuropathy is common in alcohol use disorder and is seen in 44% of the users.[25] It has been associated predominantly with thiamine deficiency. However, deficiency of other B vitamins (pyridoxine and cobalamin) and direct toxic effect of alcohol is also implicated.[26] Clinically, onset of symptoms is gradual with the involvement of both sensory and motor fibers and occasionally autonomic fibers. Neuropathy can affect both small and large peripheral nerve fibers, leading to different clinical manifestations.

Thiamine deficiency-related neuropathy affects larger fiber types, which results in motor deficits and sensory ataxia. On examination, large fiber involvement is manifested by distal limb muscle weakness and loss of proprioception and vibratory sensation. Together, these can contribute to the gait unsteadiness seen in chronic alcohol users by creating a superimposed steppage gait and reduced proprioceptive input back to the movement control loops in the central nervous system. The most common presentations include painful sensations in both lower limbs, sometimes with burning sensation or numbness, which are early symptoms.

Typically, there is a loss of vibration sensation in distal lower limbs. Later symptoms include loss of proprioception, gait disturbance, and loss of reflexes. Most advanced findings include weakness and muscle atrophy.[20] Progression is very gradual over months and involvement of upper limbs may occur late in the course. Diagnosis begins with laboratory evaluation to exclude other causes of distal, sensorimotor neuropathy including hemoglobin A1c, liver function tests, and complete blood count to evaluate for red blood cell macrocytosis.

Cerebrospinal fluid studies may show increased protein levels but should otherwise be normal in cases of alcohol neuropathy and are not recommended in routine evaluation. Electromyography and nerve conduction studies can be used to distinguish whether the neuropathy is axonal or demyelinating and whether it is motor, sensory, or mixed type. Alcoholic neuropathy shows reduced distal, sensory amplitudes, and to a lesser extent, reduced motor amplitudes on nerve conduction studies.[20] Abstinence and vitamin supplementation including thiamine are the treatments advocated for this condition.[25] In mild-to-moderate cases, near-complete improvement can be achieved.[20] Randomized controlled trials have showed a significant improvement in alcoholic polyneuropathy with thiamine treatment.[27],[28]Marchiafava–Bignami syndromeThis is a rare but fatal condition seen in chronic alcohol users that is characterized by progressive demyelination and necrosis of the corpus callosum. The association of this syndrome with thiamine deficiency is not very clear, and direct toxic effects of alcohol are also suggested.[29] The clinical syndrome is variable and presentation can be acute, subacute, or chronic.

In acute forms, it is predominantly characterized by the altered mental state such as delirium, stupor, or coma.[30] Other clinical features in neuroimaging confirmed Marchiafava–Bignami syndrome (MBS) cases include impaired gait, dysarthria, mutism, signs of split-brain syndrome, pyramidal tract signs, primitive reflexes, rigidity, incontinence, gaze palsy, diplopia, and sensory symptoms.[30] Neuropsychiatric manifestations are common and include psychotic symptoms, depression, apathy, aggressive behavior, and sometimes dementia.[29] MRI scan shows lesions of the corpus callosum, particularly splenium. Treatment for this condition is mostly supportive and use of nutritional supplements and steroids. However, there are several reports of improvement of this syndrome with thiamine at variable doses including reports of beneficial effects with high-dose strategy.[29],[30],[31] Early initiation of thiamine, preferably within 2 weeks of the onset of symptoms is associated with a better outcome. Therefore, high-dose thiamine should be administered to all suspected cases of MBS.

Laboratory Diagnosis of Thiamine Deficiency Estimation of thiamine and thiamine pyrophosphate levels may confirm the diagnosis of deficiency. Levels of thiamine in the blood are not reliable indicators of thiamine status. Low erythrocyte transketolase activity is also helpful.[32],[33] Transketolase concentrations of <120 nmol/L have also been used to indicate deficiency, while concentrations of 120–150 nmol/L suggest marginal thiamine status.[1] However, these tests are not routinely performed as it is time consuming, expensive, and may not be readily available.[34] The ETKA assay is a functional test rather than a direct measurement of thiamin status and therefore may be influenced by factors other than thiamine deficiency such as diabetes mellitus and polyneuritis.[1] Hence, treatment should be initiated in the absence of laboratory confirmation of thiamine deficiency. Furthermore, treatment should not be delayed if tests are ordered, but the results are awaited.

Electroencephalographic abnormalities in thiamine deficiency states range from diffuse mild-to-moderate slow waves and are not a good diagnostic option, as the prevalence of abnormalities among patients is inconsistent.[35]Surrogate markers, which reflect chronic alcohol use and nutritional deficiency other than thiamine, may be helpful in identifying at-risk patients. This includes gamma glutamate transferase, aspartate aminotransferase. Alanine transaminase ratio >2:1, and increased mean corpuscular volume.[36] They are useful when a reliable history of alcohol use is not readily available, specifically in emergency departments when treatment needs to be started immediately to avoid long-term consequences. Thiamine Replacement Therapy Oral versus parenteral thiamineIntestinal absorption of thiamine depends on active transport through thiamine transporter 1 and 2, which follow saturation kinetics.[1] Therefore, the rate and amount of absorption of thiamine in healthy individuals is limited.

In healthy volunteers, a 10 mg dose results in maximal absorption of thiamine, and any doses higher than this do not increase thiamine levels. Therefore, the maximum amount of thiamine absorbed from 10 mg or higher dose is between 4.3 and 5.6 mg.[37] However, it has been suggested that, although thiamine transport occurs through the energy-requiring, sodium-dependent active process at physiologic concentrations, at higher supraphysiologic concentrations thiamine uptake is mostly a passive process.[38] Smithline et al. Have demonstrated that it is possible to achieve higher serum thiamine levels with oral doses up to 1500 mg.[39]In chronic alcohol users, intestinal absorption is impaired. Hence, absorption rates are expected to be much lower.

It is approximately 30% of that seen in healthy individuals, i.e., 1.5 mg of thiamine is absorbed from 10 mg oral thiamine.[3] In those consuming alcohol and have poor nutrition, not more than 0.8 mg of thiamine is absorbed.[2],[3],[6] The daily thiamine requirement is 1–1.6 mg/day, which may be more in alcohol-dependent patients at risk for Wernicke encephalopathy.[1] It is highly likely that oral supplementation with thiamine will be inadequate in alcohol-dependent individuals who continue to drink. Therefore, parenteral thiamine is preferred for supplementation in deficiency states associated with chronic alcohol use. Therapy involving parenteral thiamine is considered safe except for occasional circumstances of allergic reactions involving pruritus and local irritation.There is a small, but definite risk of anaphylaxis with parenteral thiamine, specifically with intravenous administration (1/250,000 intravenous injections).[40] Diluting thiamine in 50–100 mg normal saline for infusion may reduce the risk. However, parenteral thiamine should always be administered under observation with the necessary facilities for resuscitation.A further important issue involves the timing of administration of thiamine relative to the course of alcohol abuse or dependence.

Administration of thiamine treatment to patients experiencing alcohol withdrawal may also be influenced by other factors such as magnesium depletion, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor upregulation, or liver impairment, all of which may alter thiamine metabolism and utilization.[6],[14]Thiamine or other preparations (e.g., benfotiamine)The thiamine transporters limit the rate of absorption of orally administered thiamine. Allithiamines (e.g., benfotiamine) are the lipid-soluble thiamine derivatives that are absorbed better, result in higher thiamine levels, and are retained longer in the body.[41] The thiamine levels with orally administered benfotiamine are much higher than oral thiamine and almost equals to intravenous thiamine given at the same dosage.[42]Benfotiamine has other beneficial effects including inhibition of production of advanced glycation end products, thus protecting against diabetic vascular complications.[41] It also modulates nuclear transcription factor κB (NK-κB), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, glycogen synthase kinase 3 β, etc., that play a role in cell repair and survival.[41] Benfotiamine has been found to be effective for the treatment of alcoholic peripheral neuropathy.[27]Dosing of thiamineAs the prevalence of thiamine deficiency is very common in chronic alcohol users, the requirement of thiamine increases in active drinkers and it is difficult to rapidly determine thiamine levels using laboratory tests, it is prudent that all patients irrespective of nutritional status should be administered parenteral thiamine. The dose should be 100 mg thiamine daily for 3–5 days during inpatient treatment. Commonly, multivitamin injections are added to intravenous infusions.

Patients at risk for thiamine deficiency should receive 250 mg of thiamine daily intramuscularly for 3–5 days, followed by oral thiamine 100 mg daily.[6]Thiamine plasma levels reduce to 20% of peak value after approximately 2 h of parenteral administration, thus reducing the effective “window period” for passive diffusion to the central nervous system.[6] Therefore, in thiamine deficient individuals with features of Wernicke encephalopathy should receive thiamine thrice daily.High-dose parenteral thiamine administered thrice daily has been advocated in patients at risk for Wernicke encephalopathy.[43] The Royal College of Physicians guideline recommends that patients with suspected Wernicke encephalopathy should receive 500 mg thiamine diluted in 50–100 ml of normal saline infusion over 30 min three times daily for 2–3 days and sometimes for longer periods.[13] If there are persistent symptoms such as confusion, cerebellar symptoms, or memory impairment, this regimen can be continued until the symptoms improve. If symptoms improve, oral thiamine 100 mg thrice daily can be continued for prolonged periods.[6],[40] A similar treatment regimen is advocated for alcoholic cerebellar degeneration as well. Doses more than 500 mg intramuscular or intravenous three times a day for 3–5 days, followed by 250 mg once daily for a further 3–5 days is also recommended by some guidelines (e.g., British Association for Psychopharmacology).[44]Other effects of thiamineThere are some data to suggest that thiamine deficiency can modulate alcohol consumption and may result in pathological drinking. Benfotiamine 600 mg/day as compared to placebo for 6 months was well tolerated and found to decrease psychiatric distress in males and reduce alcohol consumption in females with severe alcohol dependence.[45],[46] Other Factors During Thiamine Therapy Correction of hypomagnesemiaMagnesium is a cofactor for many thiamine-dependent enzymes in carbohydrate metabolism.

Patients may fail to respond to thiamine supplementation in the presence of hypomagnesemia.[47] Magnesium deficiency is common in chronic alcohol users and is seen in 30% of individuals.[48],[49] It can occur because of increased renal excretion of magnesium, poor intake, decreased absorption because of Vitamin D deficiency, the formation of undissociated magnesium soaps with free fatty acids.[48],[49]The usual adult dose is 35–50 mmol of magnesium sulfate added to 1 L isotonic (saline) given over 12–24 h.[6] The dose has to be titrated against plasma magnesium levels. It is recommended to reduce the dose in renal failure. Contraindications include patients with documented hypersensitivity and those with heart block, Addison's disease, myocardial damage, severe hepatitis, or hypophosphatemia. Do not administer intravenous magnesium unless hypomagnesemia is confirmed.[6]Other B-complex vitaminsMost patients with deficiency of thiamine will also have reduced levels of other B vitamins including niacin, pyridoxine, and cobalamin that require replenishment.

For patients admitted to the intensive care unit with symptoms that may mimic or mask Wernicke encephalopathy, based on the published literature, routine supplementation during the 1st day of admission includes 200–500 mg intravenous thiamine every 8 h, 64 mg/kg magnesium sulfate (≈4–5 g for most adult patients), and 400–1000 μg intravenous folate.[50] If alcoholic ketoacidosis is suspected, dextrose-containing fluids are recommended over normal saline.[50] Precautions to be Taken When Administering Parenteral Thiamine It is recommended to monitor for anaphylaxis and has appropriate facilities for resuscitation and for treating anaphylaxis readily available including adrenaline and corticosteroids. Anaphylaxis has been reported at the rate of approximately 4/1 million pairs of ampoules of Pabrinex (a pair of high potency vitamins available in the UK containing 500 mg of thiamine (1:250,000 I/V administrations).[40] Intramuscular thiamine is reported to have a lower incidence of anaphylactic reactions than intravenous administration.[40] The reaction has been attributed to nonspecific histamine release.[51] Administer intravenous thiamine slowly, preferably by slow infusion in 100 ml normal saline over 15–30 min. Conclusions Risk factors for thiamine deficiency should be assessed in chronic alcohol users. A high index of suspicion and a lower threshold to diagnose thiamine deficiency states including Wernicke encephalopathy is needed.

Several other presentations such as cerebellar syndrome, MBS, polyneuropathy, and delirium tremens could be related to thiamine deficiency and should be treated with protocols similar to Wernicke encephalopathy. High-dose thiamine is recommended for the treatment of suspected Wernicke encephalopathy and related conditions [Figure 1]. However, evidence in terms of randomized controlled trials is lacking, and the recommendations are based on small studies and anecdotal reports. Nevertheless, as all these conditions respond to thiamine supplementation, it is possible that these have overlapping pathophysiology and are better considered as Wernicke encephalopathy spectrum disorders.Figure 1.

Thiamine recommendations for patients with alcohol use disorder. AHistory of alcohol use, but no clinical features of WE. BNo clinical features of WE, but with risk factors such as complicated withdrawal (delirium, seizures). CClinical features of WE (ataxia, opthalmoplegia, global confusion)Click here to viewFinancial support and sponsorshipNil.Conflicts of interestThere are no conflicts of interest.

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Neuroscience 1999;91:429-38. 24.Graham JR, Woodhouse D, Read FH. Massive thiamine dosage in an alcoholic with cerebellar cortical degeneration. Lancet 1971;2:107.

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26.Chopra K, Tiwari V. Alcoholic neuropathy. Possible mechanisms and future treatment possibilities. Br J Clin Pharmacol 2012;73:348-62.

27.Woelk H, Lehrl S, Bitsch R, Köpcke W. Benfotiamine in treatment of alcoholic polyneuropathy. An 8-week randomized controlled study (BAP I Study). Alcohol Alcohol 1998;33:631-8.

28.Peters TJ, Kotowicz J, Nyka W, Kozubski W, Kuznetsov V, Vanderbist F, et al. Treatment of alcoholic polyneuropathy with vitamin B complex. A randomised controlled trial. Alcohol Alcohol 2006;41:636-42.

29.Fernandes LM, Bezerra FR, Monteiro MC, Silva ML, de Oliveira FR, Lima RR, et al. Thiamine deficiency, oxidative metabolic pathways and ethanol-induced neurotoxicity. How poor nutrition contributes to the alcoholic syndrome, as Marchiafava-Bignami disease. Eur J Clin Nutr 2017;71:580-6.

30.Hillbom M, Saloheimo P, Fujioka S, Wszolek ZK, Juvela S, Leone MA. Diagnosis and management of Marchiafava-Bignami disease. A review of CT/MRI confirmed cases. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 2014;85:168-73.

31.Nemlekar SS, Mehta RY, Dave KR, Shah ND. Marchiafava. Bignami disease treated with parenteral thiamine. Indian J Psychol Med 2016;38:147-9.

[Full text] 32.Brin M. Erythrocyte transketolase in early thiamine deficiency. Ann N Y Acad Sci 1962;98:528-41. 33.Dreyfus PM.

Clinical application of blood transketolase determinations. N Engl J Med 1962;267:596-8. 34.Edwards KA, Tu-Maung N, Cheng K, Wang B, Baeumner AJ, Kraft CE. Thiamine assays – Advances, challenges, and caveats.

ChemistryOpen 2017;6:178-91. 35.Chandrakumar A, Bhardwaj A, 't Jong GW. Review of thiamine deficiency disorders. Wernicke encephalopathy and Korsakoff psychosis.

J Basic Clin Physiol Pharmacol 2018;30:153-62. 36.Torruellas C, French SW, Medici V. Diagnosis of alcoholic liver disease. World J Gastroenterol 2014;20:11684-99.

37.Thomson AD, Leevy CM. Observations on the mechanism of thiamine hydrochloride absorption in man. Clin Sci 1972;43:153-63. 38.Hoyumpa AM Jr., Strickland R, Sheehan JJ, Yarborough G, Nichols S.

Dual system of intestinal thiamine transport in humans. J Lab Clin Med 1982;99:701-8. 39.Smithline HA, Donnino M, Greenblatt DJ. Pharmacokinetics of high-dose oral thiamine hydrochloride in healthy subjects.

BMC Clin Pharmacol 2012;12:4. 40.Latt N, Dore G. Thiamine in the treatment of Wernicke encephalopathy in patients with alcohol use disorders. Intern Med J 2014;44:911-5.

41.Raj V, Ojha S, Howarth FC, Belur PD, Subramanya SB. Therapeutic potential of benfotiamine and its molecular targets. Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci 2018;22:3261-73. 42.Xie F, Cheng Z, Li S, Liu X, Guo X, Yu P, et al.

Pharmacokinetic study of benfotiamine and the bioavailability assessment compared to thiamine hydrochloride. J Clin Pharmacol 2014;54:688-95. 43.Cook CC, Hallwood PM, Thomson AD. B Vitamin deficiency and neuropsychiatric syndromes in alcohol misuse.

Alcohol Alcohol 1998;33:317-36. 44.Lingford-Hughes AR, Welch S, Peters L, Nutt DJ, British Association for Psychopharmacology, Expert Reviewers Group. BAP updated guidelines. Evidence-based guidelines for the pharmacological management of substance abuse, harmful use, addiction and comorbidity.

Recommendations from BAP. J Psychopharmacol 2012;26:899-952. 45.Manzardo AM, He J, Poje A, Penick EC, Campbell J, Butler MG. Double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial of benfotiamine for severe alcohol dependence.

Drug Alcohol Depend 2013;133:562-70. 46.Manzardo AM, Pendleton T, Poje A, Penick EC, Butler MG. Change in psychiatric symptomatology after benfotiamine treatment in males is related to lifetime alcoholism severity. Drug Alcohol Depend 2015;152:257-63.

47.Dingwall KM, Delima JF, Gent D, Batey RG. Hypomagnesaemia and its potential impact on thiamine utilisation in patients with alcohol misuse at the Alice Springs Hospital. Drug Alcohol Rev 2015;34:323-8. 48.Flink EB.

Magnesium deficiency in alcoholism. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 1986;10:590-4. 49.Grochowski C, Blicharska E, Baj J, Mierzwińska A, Brzozowska K, Forma A, et al. Serum iron, magnesium, copper, and manganese levels in alcoholism.

A systematic review. Molecules 2019;24:E1361. 50.Flannery AH, Adkins DA, Cook AM. Unpeeling the evidence for the banana bag.

Evidence-based recommendations for the management of alcohol-associated vitamin and electrolyte deficiencies in the ICU. Crit Care Med 2016;44:1545-52. 51.Lagunoff D, Martin TW, Read G. Agents that release histamine from mast cells.

Annu Rev Pharmacol Toxicol 1983;23:331-51. Correspondence Address:Samir Kumar PraharajDepartment of Psychiatry, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal, Karnataka IndiaSource of Support. None, Conflict of Interest. NoneDOI.

10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_440_20 Figures [Figure 1].

Abstract Thiamine where to buy generic lasix is essential for the activity of lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost several enzymes associated with energy metabolism in humans. Chronic alcohol use is associated with deficiency of thiamine along with other vitamins through several mechanisms. Several neuropsychiatric syndromes have been associated with thiamine deficiency in the context of alcohol use disorder including Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome, alcoholic cerebellar lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost syndrome, alcoholic peripheral neuropathy, and possibly, Marchiafava–Bignami syndrome. High-dose thiamine replacement is suggested for these neuropsychiatric syndromes.Keywords. Alcohol use disorder, alcoholic cerebellar syndrome, alcoholic peripheral lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost neuropathy, Marchiafava–Bignami syndrome, thiamine, Wernicke–Korsakoff syndromeHow to cite this article:Praharaj SK, Munoli RN, Shenoy S, Udupa ST, Thomas LS.

High-dose thiamine strategy in Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome and related thiamine deficiency conditions associated with alcohol use disorder. Indian J Psychiatry 2021;63:121-6How to cite this URL:Praharaj SK, Munoli RN, Shenoy lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost S, Udupa ST, Thomas LS. High-dose thiamine strategy in Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome and related thiamine deficiency conditions associated with alcohol use disorder. Indian J Psychiatry [serial online] 2021 [cited 2021 May lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost 11];63:121-6. Available from.

Https://www.indianjpsychiatry.org/text.asp?. 2021/63/2/121/313716 Introduction Thiamine is a water-soluble vitamin (B1) that plays a key role in the activity of several enzymes associated with energy metabolism. Thiamine pyrophosphate (or diphosphate) is the active form that acts as a cofactor for enzymes. The daily dietary requirement of thiamine in adults is 1–2 mg and is dependent on carbohydrate intake.[1],[2] The requirement increases if basal metabolic rate is higher, for example, during alcohol withdrawal state. Dietary sources include pork (being the major source), meat, legume, vegetables, and enriched foods.

The body can store between 30 and 50 mg of thiamine and is likely to get depleted within 4–6 weeks if the diet is deficient.[2] In those with alcohol-related liver damage, the ability to store thiamine is gradually reduced.[1],[2]Lower thiamine levels are found in 30%–80% of chronic alcohol users.[3] Thiamine deficiency occurs due to poor intake of vitamin-rich foods, impaired intestinal absorption, decreased storage capacity of liver, damage to the renal epithelial cells due to alcohol, leading to increased loss from the kidneys, and excessive loss associated with medical conditions.[2],[3] Furthermore, alcohol decreases the absorption of colonic bacterial thiamine, reduces the enzymatic activity of thiamine pyrophosphokinase, and thereby, reducing the amount of available thiamine pyrophosphate.[4] Since facilitated diffusion of thiamine into cells is dependent on a concentration gradient, reduced thiamine pyrophosphokinase activity further reduces thiamine uptake into cells.[4] Impaired utilization of thiamine is seen in certain conditions (e.g., hypomagnesemia) which are common in alcohol use disorder.[2],[3],[4] This narrative review discusses the neuropsychiatric syndromes associated with thiamine deficiency in the context of alcohol use disorder, and the treatment regimens advocated for these conditions. A PubMed search supplemented with manual search was used to identify neuropsychiatric syndromes related to thiamine deficiency in alcohol use disorder patients. Neuropsychiatric Syndromes Associated With Thiamine Deficiency Wernicke–Korsakoff syndromeWernicke encephalopathy is associated with chronic alcohol use, and if not identified and treated early, could lead to permanent brain damage characterized by an amnestic syndrome known as Korsakoff syndrome. Inappropriate treatment of Wernicke encephalopathy with lower doses of thiamine can lead to high mortality rates (~20%) and Korsakoff syndrome in ~ 80% of patients (ranges from 56% to 84%).[5],[6] The classic triad of Wernicke includes oculomotor abnormalities, cerebellar dysfunction, and confusion. Wernicke lesions are found in 12.5% of brain samples of patients with alcohol dependence.[7] However, only 20%–30% of them had a clinical diagnosis of Wernicke encephalopathy antemortem.

It has been found that many patients develop Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) following repeated subclinical episodes of thiamine deficiency.[7] In an autopsy report of 97 chronic alcohol users, only16% had all the three “classical signs,” 29% had two signs, 37% presented with one sign, and 19% had none.[8] Mental status changes are the most prevalent sign (seen in 82% of the cases), followed by eye signs (in 29%) and ataxia (23%).[8] WKS should be suspected in persons with a history of alcohol use and presenting with signs of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, acute confusion, memory disturbance, unexplained hypotension, hypothermia, coma, or unconsciousness.[9] Operational criteria for the diagnosis of Wernicke encephalopathy have been proposed by Caine et al.[10] that requires two out of four features, i.e., (a) dietary deficiency (signs such as cheilitis, glossitis, and bleeding gums), (b) oculomotor abnormalities (nystagmus, opthalmoplegia, and diplopia), (c) cerebellar dysfunction (gait ataxia, nystagmus), and (d) either altered mental state (confusion) or mild memory impairment.As it is very difficult to clinically distinguish Wernicke encephalopathy from other associated conditions such as delirium tremens, hepatic encephalopathy, or head injury, it is prudent to have a lower threshold to diagnose this if any of the clinical signs is seen. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain scan during Wernicke encephalopathy shows mammillary body atrophy and enlarged third ventricle, lesions in the medial portions of thalami and mid brain and can be used to aid diagnosis.[11],[12] However, most clinical situations warrant treatment without waiting for neuroimaging report. The treatment suggestions in the guidelines vary widely. Furthermore, hardly any evidence-based recommendations exist on a more general use of thiamine as a preventative intervention in individuals with alcohol use disorder.[13] There are very few studies that have evaluated the dose and duration of thiamine for WKS, but higher doses may result in a greater response.[6],[14] With thiamine administration rapid improvement is seen in eye movement abnormalities (improve within days or weeks) and ataxia (may take months to recover), but the effects on memory, in particular, are unclear.[4],[14] Severe memory impairment is the core feature of Korsakoff syndrome. Initial stages of the disease can present with confabulation, executive dysfunction, flattened affect, apathy, and poor insight.[15] Both the episodic and semantic memory are affected, whereas, procedural memory remains intact.[15]Thomson et al.[6] suggested the following should be treated with thiamine as they are at high risk for developing WKS.

(1) all patients with any evidence of chronic alcohol misuse and any of the following. Acute confusion, decreased conscious level, ataxia, ophthalmoplegia, memory disturbance, and hypothermia with hypotension. (2) patients with delirium tremens may often also have Wernicke encephalopathy, therefore, all of these patients should be presumed to have Wernicke encephalopathy and treated, preferably as inpatients. And (3) all hypoglycemic patients (who are treated with intravenous glucose) with evidence of chronic alcohol ingestion must be given intravenous thiamine immediately because of the risk of acutely precipitating Wernicke encephalopathy.Alcoholic cerebellar syndromeChronic alcohol use is associated with the degeneration of anterior superior vermis, leading to a clinical syndrome characterized by the subacute or chronic onset of gait ataxia and incoordination in legs, with relative sparing of upper limbs, speech, and oculomotor movements.[16] In severe cases, truncal ataxia, mild dysarthria, and incoordination of the upper limb is also found along with gait ataxia. Thiamine deficiency is considered to be the etiological factor,[17],[18] although direct toxic effects of alcohol may also contribute to this syndrome.

One-third of patients with chronic use of alcohol have evidence of alcoholic cerebellar degeneration. However, population-based studies estimate prevalence to be 14.6%.[19] The effect of alcohol on the cerebellum is graded with the most severe deficits occurring in alcohol users with the longest duration and highest severity of use. The diagnosis of cerebellar degeneration is largely clinical. MRI can be used to evaluate for vermian atrophy but is unnecessary.[20] Anterior portions of vermis are affected early, with involvement of posterior vermis and adjacent lateral hemispheres occurring late in the course could be used to differentiate alcoholic cerebellar degeneration from other conditions that cause more diffuse involvement.[21] The severity of cerebellar syndrome is more in the presence of WKS, thus could be related to thiamine deficiency.[22],[23] Therefore, this has been considered as a cerebellar presentation of WKS and should be treated in a similar way.[16] There are anecdotal evidence to suggest improvement in cerebellar syndrome with high-dose thiamine.[24]Alcoholic peripheral neuropathyPeripheral neuropathy is common in alcohol use disorder and is seen in 44% of the users.[25] It has been associated predominantly with thiamine deficiency. However, deficiency of other B vitamins (pyridoxine and cobalamin) and direct toxic effect of alcohol is also implicated.[26] Clinically, onset of symptoms is gradual with the involvement of both sensory and motor fibers and occasionally autonomic fibers.

Neuropathy can affect both small and large peripheral nerve fibers, leading to different clinical manifestations. Thiamine deficiency-related neuropathy affects larger fiber types, which results in motor deficits and sensory ataxia. On examination, large fiber involvement is manifested by distal limb muscle weakness and loss of proprioception and vibratory sensation. Together, these can contribute to the gait unsteadiness seen in chronic alcohol users by creating a superimposed steppage gait and reduced proprioceptive input back to the movement control loops in the central nervous system. The most common presentations include painful sensations in both lower limbs, sometimes with burning sensation or numbness, which are early symptoms.

Typically, there is a loss of vibration sensation in distal lower limbs. Later symptoms include loss of proprioception, gait disturbance, and loss of reflexes. Most advanced findings include weakness and muscle atrophy.[20] Progression is very gradual over months and involvement of upper limbs may occur late in the course. Diagnosis begins with laboratory evaluation to exclude other causes of distal, sensorimotor neuropathy including hemoglobin A1c, liver function tests, and complete blood count to evaluate for red blood cell macrocytosis. Cerebrospinal fluid studies may show increased protein levels but should otherwise be normal in cases of alcohol neuropathy and are not recommended in routine evaluation.

Electromyography and nerve conduction studies can be used to distinguish whether the neuropathy is axonal or demyelinating and whether it is motor, sensory, or mixed type. Alcoholic neuropathy shows reduced distal, sensory amplitudes, and to a lesser extent, reduced motor amplitudes on nerve conduction studies.[20] Abstinence and vitamin supplementation including thiamine are the treatments advocated for this condition.[25] In mild-to-moderate cases, near-complete improvement can be achieved.[20] Randomized controlled trials have showed a significant improvement in alcoholic polyneuropathy with thiamine treatment.[27],[28]Marchiafava–Bignami syndromeThis is a rare but fatal condition seen in chronic alcohol users that is characterized by progressive demyelination and necrosis of the corpus callosum. The association of this syndrome with thiamine deficiency is not very clear, and direct toxic effects of alcohol are also suggested.[29] The clinical syndrome is variable and presentation can be acute, subacute, or chronic. In acute forms, it is predominantly characterized by the altered mental state such as delirium, stupor, or coma.[30] Other clinical features in neuroimaging confirmed Marchiafava–Bignami syndrome (MBS) cases include impaired gait, dysarthria, mutism, signs of split-brain syndrome, pyramidal tract signs, primitive reflexes, rigidity, incontinence, gaze palsy, diplopia, and sensory symptoms.[30] Neuropsychiatric manifestations are common and include psychotic symptoms, depression, apathy, aggressive behavior, and sometimes dementia.[29] MRI scan shows lesions of the corpus callosum, particularly splenium. Treatment for this condition is mostly supportive and use of nutritional supplements and steroids.

However, there are several reports of improvement of this syndrome with thiamine at variable doses including reports of beneficial effects with high-dose strategy.[29],[30],[31] Early initiation of thiamine, preferably within 2 weeks of the onset of symptoms is associated with a better outcome. Therefore, high-dose thiamine should be administered to all suspected cases of MBS. Laboratory Diagnosis of Thiamine Deficiency Estimation of thiamine and thiamine pyrophosphate levels may confirm the diagnosis of deficiency. Levels of thiamine in the blood are not reliable indicators of thiamine status. Low erythrocyte transketolase activity is also helpful.[32],[33] Transketolase concentrations of <120 nmol/L have also been used to indicate deficiency, while concentrations of 120–150 nmol/L suggest marginal thiamine status.[1] However, these tests are not routinely performed as it is time consuming, expensive, and may not be readily available.[34] The ETKA assay is a functional test rather than a direct measurement of thiamin status and therefore may be influenced by factors other than thiamine deficiency such as diabetes mellitus and polyneuritis.[1] Hence, treatment should be initiated in the absence of laboratory confirmation of thiamine deficiency.

Furthermore, treatment should not be delayed if tests are ordered, but the results are awaited. Electroencephalographic abnormalities in thiamine deficiency states range from diffuse mild-to-moderate slow waves and are not a good diagnostic option, as the prevalence of abnormalities among patients is inconsistent.[35]Surrogate markers, which reflect chronic alcohol use and nutritional deficiency other than thiamine, may be helpful in identifying at-risk patients. This includes gamma glutamate transferase, aspartate aminotransferase. Alanine transaminase ratio >2:1, and increased mean corpuscular volume.[36] They are useful when a reliable history of alcohol use is not readily available, specifically in emergency departments when treatment needs to be started immediately to avoid long-term consequences. Thiamine Replacement Therapy Oral versus parenteral thiamineIntestinal absorption of thiamine depends on active transport through thiamine transporter 1 and 2, which follow saturation kinetics.[1] Therefore, the rate and amount of absorption of thiamine in healthy individuals is limited.

In healthy volunteers, a 10 mg dose results in maximal absorption of thiamine, and any doses higher than this do not increase thiamine levels. Therefore, the maximum amount of thiamine absorbed from 10 mg or higher dose is between 4.3 and 5.6 mg.[37] However, it has been suggested that, although thiamine transport occurs through the energy-requiring, sodium-dependent active process at physiologic concentrations, at higher supraphysiologic concentrations thiamine uptake is mostly a passive process.[38] Smithline et al. Have demonstrated that it is possible to achieve higher serum thiamine levels with oral doses up to 1500 mg.[39]In chronic alcohol users, intestinal absorption is impaired. Hence, absorption rates are expected to be much lower. It is approximately 30% of that seen in healthy individuals, i.e., 1.5 mg of thiamine is absorbed from 10 mg oral thiamine.[3] In those consuming alcohol and have poor nutrition, not more than 0.8 mg of thiamine is absorbed.[2],[3],[6] The daily thiamine requirement is 1–1.6 mg/day, which may be more in alcohol-dependent patients at risk for Wernicke encephalopathy.[1] It is highly likely that oral supplementation with thiamine will be inadequate in alcohol-dependent individuals who continue to drink.

Therefore, parenteral thiamine is preferred for supplementation in deficiency states associated with chronic alcohol use. Therapy involving parenteral thiamine is considered safe except for occasional circumstances of allergic reactions involving pruritus and local irritation.There is a small, but definite risk of anaphylaxis with parenteral thiamine, specifically with intravenous administration (1/250,000 intravenous injections).[40] Diluting thiamine in 50–100 mg normal saline for infusion may reduce the risk. However, parenteral thiamine should always be administered under observation with the necessary facilities for resuscitation.A further important issue involves the timing of administration of thiamine relative to the course of alcohol abuse or dependence. Administration of thiamine treatment to patients experiencing alcohol withdrawal may also be influenced by other factors such as magnesium depletion, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor upregulation, or liver impairment, all of which may alter thiamine metabolism and utilization.[6],[14]Thiamine or other preparations (e.g., benfotiamine)The thiamine transporters limit the rate of absorption of orally administered thiamine. Allithiamines (e.g., benfotiamine) are the lipid-soluble thiamine derivatives that are absorbed better, result in higher thiamine levels, and are retained longer in the body.[41] The thiamine levels with orally administered benfotiamine are much higher than oral thiamine and almost equals to intravenous thiamine given at the same dosage.[42]Benfotiamine has other beneficial effects including inhibition of production of advanced glycation end products, thus protecting against diabetic vascular complications.[41] It also modulates nuclear transcription factor κB (NK-κB), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, glycogen synthase kinase 3 β, etc., that play a role in cell repair and survival.[41] Benfotiamine has been found to be effective for the treatment of alcoholic peripheral neuropathy.[27]Dosing of thiamineAs the prevalence of thiamine deficiency is very common in chronic alcohol users, the requirement of thiamine increases in active drinkers and it is difficult to rapidly determine thiamine levels using laboratory tests, it is prudent that all patients irrespective of nutritional status should be administered parenteral thiamine.

The dose should be 100 mg thiamine daily for 3–5 days during inpatient treatment. Commonly, multivitamin injections are added to intravenous infusions. Patients at risk for thiamine deficiency should receive 250 mg of thiamine daily intramuscularly for 3–5 days, followed by oral thiamine 100 mg daily.[6]Thiamine plasma levels reduce to 20% of peak value after approximately 2 h of parenteral administration, thus reducing the effective “window period” for passive diffusion to the central nervous system.[6] Therefore, in thiamine deficient individuals with features of Wernicke encephalopathy should receive thiamine thrice daily.High-dose parenteral thiamine administered thrice daily has been advocated in patients at risk for Wernicke encephalopathy.[43] The Royal College of Physicians guideline recommends that patients with suspected Wernicke encephalopathy should receive 500 mg thiamine diluted in 50–100 ml of normal saline infusion over 30 min three times daily for 2–3 days and sometimes for longer periods.[13] If there are persistent symptoms such as confusion, cerebellar symptoms, or memory impairment, this regimen can be continued until the symptoms improve. If symptoms improve, oral thiamine 100 mg thrice daily can be continued for prolonged periods.[6],[40] A similar treatment regimen is advocated for alcoholic cerebellar degeneration as well. Doses more than 500 mg intramuscular or intravenous three times a day for 3–5 days, followed by 250 mg once daily for a further 3–5 days is also recommended by some guidelines (e.g., British Association for Psychopharmacology).[44]Other effects of thiamineThere are some data to suggest that thiamine deficiency can modulate alcohol consumption and may result in pathological drinking.

Benfotiamine 600 mg/day as compared to placebo for 6 months was well tolerated and found to decrease psychiatric distress in males and reduce alcohol consumption in females with severe alcohol dependence.[45],[46] Other Factors During Thiamine Therapy Correction of hypomagnesemiaMagnesium is a cofactor for many thiamine-dependent enzymes in carbohydrate metabolism. Patients may fail to respond to thiamine supplementation in the presence of hypomagnesemia.[47] Magnesium deficiency is common in chronic alcohol users and is seen in 30% of individuals.[48],[49] It can occur because of increased renal excretion of magnesium, poor intake, decreased absorption because of Vitamin D deficiency, the formation of undissociated magnesium soaps with free fatty acids.[48],[49]The usual adult dose is 35–50 mmol of magnesium sulfate added to 1 L isotonic (saline) given over 12–24 h.[6] The dose has to be titrated against plasma magnesium levels. It is recommended to reduce the dose in renal failure. Contraindications include patients with documented hypersensitivity and those with heart block, Addison's disease, myocardial damage, severe hepatitis, or hypophosphatemia. Do not administer intravenous magnesium unless hypomagnesemia is confirmed.[6]Other B-complex vitaminsMost patients with deficiency of thiamine will also have reduced levels of other B vitamins including niacin, pyridoxine, and cobalamin that require replenishment.

For patients admitted to the intensive care unit with symptoms that may mimic or mask Wernicke encephalopathy, based on the published literature, routine supplementation during the 1st day of admission includes 200–500 mg intravenous thiamine every 8 h, 64 mg/kg magnesium sulfate (≈4–5 g for most adult patients), and 400–1000 μg intravenous folate.[50] If alcoholic ketoacidosis is suspected, dextrose-containing fluids are recommended over normal saline.[50] Precautions to be Taken When Administering Parenteral Thiamine It is recommended to monitor for anaphylaxis and has appropriate facilities for resuscitation and for treating anaphylaxis readily available including adrenaline and corticosteroids. Anaphylaxis has been reported at the rate of approximately 4/1 million pairs of ampoules of Pabrinex (a pair of high potency vitamins available in the UK containing 500 mg of thiamine (1:250,000 I/V administrations).[40] Intramuscular thiamine is reported to have a lower incidence of anaphylactic reactions than intravenous administration.[40] The reaction has been attributed to nonspecific histamine release.[51] Administer intravenous thiamine slowly, preferably by slow infusion in 100 ml normal saline over 15–30 min. Conclusions Risk factors for thiamine deficiency should be assessed in chronic alcohol users. A high index of suspicion and a lower threshold to diagnose thiamine deficiency states including Wernicke encephalopathy is needed. Several other presentations such as cerebellar syndrome, MBS, polyneuropathy, and delirium tremens could be related to thiamine deficiency and should be treated with protocols similar to Wernicke encephalopathy.

High-dose thiamine is recommended for the treatment of suspected Wernicke encephalopathy and related conditions [Figure 1]. However, evidence in terms of randomized controlled trials is lacking, and the recommendations are based on small studies and anecdotal reports. Nevertheless, as all these conditions respond to thiamine supplementation, it is possible that these have overlapping pathophysiology and are better considered as Wernicke encephalopathy spectrum disorders.Figure 1. Thiamine recommendations for patients with alcohol use disorder. AHistory of alcohol use, but no clinical features of WE.

BNo clinical features of WE, but with risk factors such as complicated withdrawal (delirium, seizures). CClinical features of WE (ataxia, opthalmoplegia, global confusion)Click here to viewFinancial support and sponsorshipNil.Conflicts of interestThere are no conflicts of interest. References 1.Frank LL. Thiamin in clinical practice. JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr 2015;39:503-20.

2.Thomson AD, Marshall EJ. The natural history and pathophysiology of Wernicke's Encephalopathy and Korsakoff's Psychosis. Alcohol Alcohol 2006;41:151-8. 3.Thomson AD, Guerrini I, Marshall EJ. Wernicke's encephalopathy.

Role of thiamine. Pract Gastroenterol 2009;33:21-30. 4.Isenberg-Grzeda E, Kutner HE, Nicolson SE. Wernicke-Korsakoff-syndrome. Under-recognized and under-treated.

Psychosomatics 2012;53:507-16. 5.Wood B, Currie J, Breen K. Wernicke's encephalopathy in a metropolitan hospital. A prospective study of incidence, characteristics and outcome. Med J Aust 1986;144:12-6.

6.Thomson AD, Cook CC, Touquet R, Henry JA, Royal College of Physicians, London. The Royal College of Physicians report on alcohol. Guidelines for managing Wernicke's encephalopathy in the accident and Emergency Department. Alcohol Alcohol 2002;37:513-21. 7.Harper C.

Thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency and associated brain damage is still common throughout the world and prevention is simple and safe!. Eur J Neurol 2006;13:1078-82. 8.Harper CG, Giles M, Finlay-Jones R. Clinical signs in the Wernicke-Korsakoff complex. A retrospective analysis of 131 cases diagnosed at necropsy.

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Operational criteria for the classification of chronic alcoholics. Identification of Wernicke's encephalopathy. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1997;62:51-60. 11.Sullivan EV, Pfefferbaum A. Neuroimaging of the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

Alcohol Alcohol 2009;44:155-65. 12.Jung YC, Chanraud S, Sullivan EV. Neuroimaging of Wernicke's encephalopathy and Korsakoff's syndrome. Neuropsychol Rev 2012;22:170-80. 13.Pruckner N, Baumgartner J, Hinterbuchinger B, Glahn A, Vyssoki S, Vyssoki B.

Thiamine substitution in alcohol use disorder. A narrative review of medical guidelines. Eur Addict Res 2019;25:103-10. 14.Day E, Bentham PW, Callaghan R, Kuruvilla T, George S. Thiamine for prevention and treatment of Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome in people who abuse alcohol.

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A critical review. Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat 2017;13:2875-90. 16.Laureno R. Nutritional cerebellar degeneration, with comments on its relationship to Wernicke disease and alcoholism. Handb Clin Neurol 2012;103:175-87.

17.Maschke M, Weber J, Bonnet U, Dimitrova A, Bohrenkämper J, Sturm S, et al. Vermal atrophy of alcoholics correlate with serum thiamine levels but not with dentate iron concentrations as estimated by MRI. J Neurol 2005;252:704-11. 18.Mulholland PJ, Self RL, Stepanyan TD, Little HJ, Littleton JM, Prendergast MA. Thiamine deficiency in the pathogenesis of chronic ethanol-associated cerebellar damage in vitro.

Neuroscience 2005;135:1129-39. 19.Del Brutto OH, Mera RM, Sullivan LJ, Zambrano M, King NR. Population-based study of alcoholic cerebellar degeneration. The Atahualpa Project. J Neurol Sci 2016;367:356-60.

20.Hammoud N, Jimenez-Shahed J. Chronic neurologic effects of alcohol. Clin Liver Dis 2019;23:141-55. 21.Lee JH, Heo SH, Chang DI. Early-stage alcoholic cerebellar degeneration.

Diagnostic imaging clues. J Korean Med Sci 2015;30:1539. 22.Phillips SC, Harper CG, Kril JJ. The contribution of Wernicke's encephalopathy to alcohol-related cerebellar damage. Drug Alcohol Rev 1990;9:53-60.

23.Baker KG, Harding AJ, Halliday GM, Kril JJ, Harper CG. Neuronal loss in functional zones of the cerebellum of chronic alcoholics with and without Wernicke's encephalopathy. Neuroscience 1999;91:429-38. 24.Graham JR, Woodhouse D, Read FH. Massive thiamine dosage in an alcoholic with cerebellar cortical degeneration.

Lancet 1971;2:107. 25.Julian T, Glascow N, Syeed R, Zis P. Alcohol-related peripheral neuropathy. A systematic review and meta-analysis. J Neurol 2018;22:1-3.

26.Chopra K, Tiwari V. Alcoholic neuropathy. Possible mechanisms and future treatment possibilities. Br J Clin Pharmacol 2012;73:348-62. 27.Woelk H, Lehrl S, Bitsch R, Köpcke W.

Benfotiamine in treatment of alcoholic polyneuropathy. An 8-week randomized controlled study (BAP I Study). Alcohol Alcohol 1998;33:631-8. 28.Peters TJ, Kotowicz J, Nyka W, Kozubski W, Kuznetsov V, Vanderbist F, et al. Treatment of alcoholic polyneuropathy with vitamin B complex.

A randomised controlled trial. Alcohol Alcohol 2006;41:636-42. 29.Fernandes LM, Bezerra FR, Monteiro MC, Silva ML, de Oliveira FR, Lima RR, et al. Thiamine deficiency, oxidative metabolic pathways and ethanol-induced neurotoxicity. How poor nutrition contributes to the alcoholic syndrome, as Marchiafava-Bignami disease.

Eur J Clin Nutr 2017;71:580-6. 30.Hillbom M, Saloheimo P, Fujioka S, Wszolek ZK, Juvela S, Leone MA. Diagnosis and management of Marchiafava-Bignami disease. A review of CT/MRI confirmed cases. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 2014;85:168-73.

31.Nemlekar SS, Mehta RY, Dave KR, Shah ND. Marchiafava. Bignami disease treated with parenteral thiamine. Indian J Psychol Med 2016;38:147-9. [Full text] 32.Brin M.

Erythrocyte transketolase in early thiamine deficiency. Ann N Y Acad Sci 1962;98:528-41. 33.Dreyfus PM. Clinical application of blood transketolase determinations. N Engl J Med 1962;267:596-8.

34.Edwards KA, Tu-Maung N, Cheng K, Wang B, Baeumner AJ, Kraft CE. Thiamine assays – Advances, challenges, and caveats. ChemistryOpen 2017;6:178-91. 35.Chandrakumar A, Bhardwaj A, 't Jong GW. Review of thiamine deficiency disorders.

Wernicke encephalopathy and Korsakoff psychosis. J Basic Clin Physiol Pharmacol 2018;30:153-62. 36.Torruellas C, French SW, Medici V. Diagnosis of alcoholic liver disease. World J Gastroenterol 2014;20:11684-99.

37.Thomson AD, Leevy CM. Observations on the mechanism of thiamine hydrochloride absorption in man. Clin Sci 1972;43:153-63. 38.Hoyumpa AM Jr., Strickland R, Sheehan JJ, Yarborough G, Nichols S. Dual system of intestinal thiamine transport in humans.

J Lab Clin Med 1982;99:701-8. 39.Smithline HA, Donnino M, Greenblatt DJ. Pharmacokinetics of high-dose oral thiamine hydrochloride in healthy subjects. BMC Clin Pharmacol 2012;12:4. 40.Latt N, Dore G.

Thiamine in the treatment of Wernicke encephalopathy in patients with alcohol use disorders. Intern Med J 2014;44:911-5. 41.Raj V, Ojha S, Howarth FC, Belur PD, Subramanya SB. Therapeutic potential of benfotiamine and its molecular targets. Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci 2018;22:3261-73.

42.Xie F, Cheng Z, Li S, Liu X, Guo X, Yu P, et al. Pharmacokinetic study of benfotiamine and the bioavailability assessment compared to thiamine hydrochloride. J Clin Pharmacol 2014;54:688-95. 43.Cook CC, Hallwood PM, Thomson AD. B Vitamin deficiency and neuropsychiatric syndromes in alcohol misuse.

Alcohol Alcohol 1998;33:317-36. 44.Lingford-Hughes AR, Welch S, Peters L, Nutt DJ, British Association for Psychopharmacology, Expert Reviewers Group. BAP updated guidelines. Evidence-based guidelines for the pharmacological management of substance abuse, harmful use, addiction and comorbidity. Recommendations from BAP.

J Psychopharmacol 2012;26:899-952. 45.Manzardo AM, He J, Poje A, Penick EC, Campbell J, Butler MG. Double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial of benfotiamine for severe alcohol dependence. Drug Alcohol Depend 2013;133:562-70. 46.Manzardo AM, Pendleton T, Poje A, Penick EC, Butler MG.

Change in psychiatric symptomatology after benfotiamine treatment in males is related to lifetime alcoholism severity. Drug Alcohol Depend 2015;152:257-63. 47.Dingwall KM, Delima JF, Gent D, Batey RG. Hypomagnesaemia and its potential impact on thiamine utilisation in patients with alcohol misuse at the Alice Springs Hospital. Drug Alcohol Rev 2015;34:323-8.

48.Flink EB. Magnesium deficiency in alcoholism. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 1986;10:590-4. 49.Grochowski C, Blicharska E, Baj J, Mierzwińska A, Brzozowska K, Forma A, et al. Serum iron, magnesium, copper, and manganese levels in alcoholism.

A systematic review. Molecules 2019;24:E1361. 50.Flannery AH, Adkins DA, Cook AM. Unpeeling the evidence for the banana bag. Evidence-based recommendations for the management of alcohol-associated vitamin and electrolyte deficiencies in the ICU.

Crit Care Med 2016;44:1545-52. 51.Lagunoff D, Martin TW, Read G. Agents that release histamine from mast cells. Annu Rev Pharmacol Toxicol 1983;23:331-51. Correspondence Address:Samir Kumar PraharajDepartment of Psychiatry, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal, Karnataka IndiaSource of Support.

None, Conflict of Interest. NoneDOI. 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_440_20 Figures [Figure 1].

Where should I keep Lasix?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 86 degrees F). Protect from light. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.

Where can i get lasix

Credit. IStock Share Fast Facts New @HopkinsMedicine study finds African-American women with common form of hair loss at increased risk of uterine fibroids - Click to Tweet New study in @JAMADerm shows most common form of alopecia (hair loss) in African-American women associated with higher risks of uterine fibroids - Click to Tweet In a study of medical records gathered on hundreds of thousands of African-American women, Johns Hopkins researchers say they have evidence that women with a common form of hair loss have an increased chance of developing uterine leiomyomas, or fibroids.In a report on the research, published in the December 27 issue of JAMA Dermatology, the researchers call on physicians who treat women with central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA) to make patients aware that they may be at increased risk for fibroids and should be screened for the condition, particularly if they have symptoms such as heavy bleeding and pain. CCCA predominantly affects black women and is the most common form of permanent alopecia in this population. The excess scar tissue that forms as a result of this type of hair loss may also explain the higher risk for uterine fibroids, which are characterized by fibrous growths in the lining of the womb. Crystal Aguh, M.D., assistant professor of dermatology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, says the scarring associated with CCCA is similar to the scarring associated with excess fibrous tissue elsewhere in the body, a situation that may explain why women with this type of hair loss are at a higher risk for fibroids.People of African descent, she notes, are more prone to develop other disorders of abnormal scarring, termed fibroproliferative disorders, such as keloids (a type of raised scar after trauma), scleroderma (an autoimmune disorder marked by thickening of the skin as well as internal organs), some types of lupus and clogged arteries.

During a four-year period from 2013-2017, the researchers analyzed patient data from the Johns Hopkins electronic medical record system (Epic) of 487,104 black women ages 18 and over. The prevalence of those with fibroids was compared in patients with and without CCCA. Overall, the researchers found that 13.9 percent of women with CCCA also had a history of uterine fibroids compared to only 3.3 percent of black women without the condition. In absolute numbers, out of the 486,000 women who were reviewed, 16,212 had fibroids.Within that population, 447 had CCCA, of which 62 had fibroids. The findings translate to a fivefold increased risk of uterine fibroids in women with CCCA, compared to age, sex and race matched controls.

Aguh cautions that their study does not suggest any cause and effect relationship, or prove a common cause for both conditions. €œThe cause of the link between the two conditions remains unclear,” she says. However, the association was strong enough, she adds, to recommend that physicians and patients be made aware of it. Women with this type of scarring alopecia should be screened not only for fibroids, but also for other disorders associated with excess fibrous tissue, Aguh says. An estimated 70 percent of white women and between 80 and 90 percent of African-American women will develop fibroids by age 50, according to the NIH, and while CCCA is likely underdiagnosed, some estimates report a prevalence of rates as high as 17 percent of black women having this condition.

The other authors on this paper were Ginette A. Okoye, M.D. Of Johns Hopkins and Yemisi Dina of Meharry Medical College.Credit. The New England Journal of Medicine Share Fast Facts This study clears up how big an effect the mutational burden has on outcomes to immune checkpoint inhibitors across many different cancer types. - Click to Tweet The number of mutations in a tumor’s DNA is a good predictor of whether it will respond to a class of cancer immunotherapy drugs known as checkpoint inhibitors.

- Click to Tweet The “mutational burden,” or the number of mutations present in a tumor’s DNA, is a good predictor of whether that cancer type will respond to a class of cancer immunotherapy drugs known as checkpoint inhibitors, a new study led by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers shows. The finding, published in the Dec. 21 New England Journal of Medicine, could be used to guide future clinical trials for these drugs. Checkpoint inhibitors are a relatively new class of drug that helps the immune system recognize cancer by interfering with mechanisms cancer cells use to hide from immune cells. As a result, the drugs cause the immune system to fight cancer in the same way that it would fight an .

These medicines have had remarkable success in treating some types of cancers that historically have had poor prognoses, such as advanced melanoma and lung cancer. However, these therapies have had little effect on other deadly cancer types, such as pancreatic cancer and glioblastoma. The mutational burden of certain tumor types has previously been proposed as an explanation for why certain cancers respond better than others to immune checkpoint inhibitors says study leader Mark Yarchoan, M.D., chief medical oncology fellow. Work by Dung Le, M.D., associate professor of oncology, and other researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and its Bloomberg~Kimmel Cancer Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy showed that colon cancers that carry a high number of mutations are more likely to respond to checkpoint inhibitors than those that have fewer mutations. However, exactly how big an effect the mutational burden has on outcomes to immune checkpoint inhibitors across many different cancer types was unclear.

To investigate this question, Yarchoan and colleagues Alexander Hopkins, Ph.D., research fellow, and Elizabeth Jaffee, M.D., co-director of the Skip Viragh Center for Pancreas Cancer Clinical Research and Patient Care and associate director of the Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute, combed the medical literature for the results of clinical trials using checkpoint inhibitors on various different types of cancer. They combined these findings with data on the mutational burden of thousands of tumor samples from patients with different tumor types. Analyzing 27 different cancer types for which both pieces of information were available, the researchers found a strong correlation. The higher a cancer type’s mutational burden tends to be, the more likely it is to respond to checkpoint inhibitors. More than half of the differences in how well cancers responded to immune checkpoint inhibitors could be explained by the mutational burden of that cancer.

€œThe idea that a tumor type with more mutations might be easier to treat than one with fewer sounds a little counterintuitive. It’s one of those things that doesn’t sound right when you hear it,” says Hopkins. €œBut with immunotherapy, the more mutations you have, the more chances the immune system has to recognize the tumor.” Although this finding held true for the vast majority of cancer types they studied, there were some outliers in their analysis, says Yarchoan. For example, Merkel cell cancer, a rare and highly aggressive skin cancer, tends to have a moderate number of mutations yet responds extremely well to checkpoint inhibitors. However, he explains, this cancer type is often caused by a lasix, which seems to encourage a strong immune response despite the cancer’s lower mutational burden.

In contrast, the most common type of colorectal cancer has moderate mutational burden, yet responds poorly to checkpoint inhibitors for reasons that are still unclear. Yarchoan notes that these findings could help guide clinical trials to test checkpoint inhibitors on cancer types for which these drugs haven’t yet been tried. Future studies might also focus on finding ways to prompt cancers with low mutational burdens to behave like those with higher mutational burdens so that they will respond better to these therapies. He and his colleagues plan to extend this line of research by investigating whether mutational burden might be a good predictor of whether cancers in individual patients might respond well to this class of immunotherapy drugs. €œThe end goal is precision medicine—moving beyond what’s true for big groups of patients to see whether we can use this information to help any given patient,” he says.

Yarchoan receives funding from the Norman &. Ruth Rales Foundation and the Conquer Cancer Foundation. Through a licensing agreement with Aduro Biotech, Jaffee has the potential to receive royalties in the future..

Credit where can i buy lasix over the counter lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost. IStock Share Fast Facts New @HopkinsMedicine study finds African-American women with common form of hair loss at increased risk of uterine fibroids - Click to Tweet New study in @JAMADerm shows most common form of alopecia (hair loss) in African-American women associated with higher risks of uterine fibroids - Click to Tweet In a study of medical records gathered on hundreds of thousands of African-American women, Johns Hopkins researchers say they have evidence that women with a common form of hair loss have an increased chance of developing uterine leiomyomas, or fibroids.In a report on the research, published in the December 27 issue of JAMA Dermatology, the researchers call on physicians who treat women with central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA) to make patients aware that they may be at increased risk for fibroids and should be screened for the condition, particularly if they have symptoms such as heavy bleeding and pain. CCCA predominantly lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost affects black women and is the most common form of permanent alopecia in this population. The excess scar tissue that forms as a result of this type of hair loss may also explain the higher risk for uterine fibroids, which are characterized by fibrous growths in the lining of the womb. Crystal Aguh, M.D., assistant professor of dermatology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, says the scarring associated with CCCA is similar to the scarring associated with excess fibrous tissue elsewhere in the body, a situation that may explain why women with this type of hair loss are at a higher risk for fibroids.People of African descent, she notes, are more prone to develop other disorders of abnormal scarring, termed fibroproliferative disorders, such as keloids (a type of raised scar after lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost trauma), scleroderma (an autoimmune disorder marked by thickening of the skin as well as internal organs), some types of lupus and clogged arteries.

During a four-year period from 2013-2017, the researchers analyzed patient data from the Johns Hopkins electronic medical record system (Epic) of 487,104 black women ages 18 and over. The prevalence of those with fibroids was compared lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost in patients with and without CCCA. Overall, the researchers found that 13.9 percent of women with CCCA also had a history of uterine fibroids compared to only 3.3 percent of black women without the condition. In absolute numbers, out of the 486,000 women who were reviewed, 16,212 had fibroids.Within that population, 447 had CCCA, of which 62 had fibroids. The findings translate to a fivefold lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost increased risk of uterine fibroids in women with CCCA, compared to age, sex and race matched controls.

Aguh cautions that their study does not suggest any cause and effect relationship, or prove a common cause for both conditions. €œThe cause lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost of the link between the two conditions remains unclear,” she says. However, the association was strong enough, she adds, to recommend that physicians and patients be made aware of it. Women with this type of scarring alopecia should be screened not only for fibroids, but also for other disorders associated with excess lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost fibrous tissue, Aguh says. An estimated 70 percent of white women and between 80 and 90 percent of African-American women will develop fibroids by age 50, according to the NIH, and while CCCA is likely underdiagnosed, some estimates report a prevalence of rates as high as 17 percent of black women having this condition.

The other authors on this paper lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost were Ginette A. Okoye, M.D. Of Johns Hopkins and Yemisi Dina of Meharry Medical College.Credit. The New England Journal of Medicine Share Fast Facts This study clears up how big an effect the mutational burden has on outcomes to immune checkpoint inhibitors across many different cancer types lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost. - Click to Tweet The number of mutations in a tumor’s DNA is a good predictor of whether it will respond to a class of cancer immunotherapy drugs known as checkpoint inhibitors.

- Click to Tweet The “mutational burden,” or the number of mutations present in a tumor’s DNA, is a good predictor of whether that cancer type will respond to a class of cancer immunotherapy lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost drugs known as checkpoint inhibitors, a new study led by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers shows. The finding, published in the Dec. 21 New England Journal of Medicine, lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost could be used to guide future clinical trials for these drugs. Checkpoint inhibitors are a relatively new class of drug that helps the immune system recognize cancer by interfering with mechanisms cancer cells use to hide from immune cells. As a result, the drugs cause the immune system to fight cancer in the same order lasix online way that it would fight an .

These medicines have had remarkable success in treating lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost some types of cancers that historically have had poor prognoses, such as advanced melanoma and lung cancer. However, these therapies have had little effect on other deadly cancer types, such as pancreatic cancer and glioblastoma. The mutational burden of certain tumor types has previously been proposed as an explanation for why certain cancers respond better than others to immune checkpoint inhibitors says study leader Mark Yarchoan, lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost M.D., chief medical oncology fellow. Work by Dung Le, M.D., associate professor of oncology, and other researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and its Bloomberg~Kimmel Cancer Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy showed that colon cancers that carry a high number of mutations are more likely to respond to checkpoint inhibitors than those that have fewer mutations. However, exactly how big an effect the mutational burden has on outcomes to immune checkpoint inhibitors across many different cancer types was unclear lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost.

To investigate this question, Yarchoan and colleagues Alexander Hopkins, Ph.D., research fellow, and Elizabeth Jaffee, M.D., co-director of the Skip Viragh Center for Pancreas Cancer Clinical Research and Patient Care and associate director of the Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute, combed the medical literature for the results of clinical trials using checkpoint inhibitors on various different types of cancer. They combined these findings with data on the mutational burden of thousands of tumor samples from patients lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost with different tumor types. Analyzing 27 different cancer types for which both pieces of information were available, the researchers found a strong correlation. The higher a cancer type’s mutational burden tends to be, the more likely it is to respond to checkpoint inhibitors. More than half of the differences in how well cancers responded lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost to immune checkpoint inhibitors could be explained by the mutational burden of that cancer.

€œThe idea that a tumor type with more mutations might be easier to treat than one with fewer sounds a little counterintuitive. It’s one lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost of those things that doesn’t sound right when you hear it,” says Hopkins. €œBut with immunotherapy, the more mutations you have, the more chances the immune system has to recognize the tumor.” Although this finding held true for the vast majority of cancer types they studied, there were some outliers in their analysis, says Yarchoan. For example, Merkel lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost cell cancer, a rare and highly aggressive skin cancer, tends to have a moderate number of mutations yet responds extremely well to checkpoint inhibitors. However, he explains, this cancer type is often caused by a lasix, which seems to encourage a strong immune response despite the cancer’s lower mutational burden.

In contrast, the most common type of colorectal cancer has moderate mutational burden, yet responds poorly to checkpoint inhibitors for reasons that are still unclear. Yarchoan notes that these findings could help guide lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost clinical trials to test checkpoint inhibitors on cancer types for which these drugs haven’t yet been tried. Future studies might also focus on finding ways to prompt cancers with low mutational burdens to behave like those with higher mutational burdens so that they will respond better to these therapies. He and his colleagues plan to extend this line of research by investigating whether mutational burden might be a good predictor of whether lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost cancers in individual patients might respond well to this class of immunotherapy drugs. €œThe end goal is precision medicine—moving beyond what’s true for big groups of patients to see whether we can use this information to help any given patient,” he says.

Yarchoan receives funding from the Norman &. Ruth Rales Foundation and the Conquer Cancer Foundation. Through a licensing agreement with Aduro Biotech, Jaffee has the potential to receive royalties in the future..

Blood pressure medication lasix

Explore a full-page map Exactly one year after the rural hypertension medications blood pressure medication lasix rate first exceeded the urban rate, rural counties have moved back to the front edge of the lasix. The rate of new s last week was a third higher in rural counties than urban ones, a Daily Yonder analysis shows. The current trend blood pressure medication lasix began the week of August 14. The last time the rural rate of new s was this much higher than the metro rate was the second week of August 2020. After surpassing the metro rate for the first time that week, the rural rate of new s remained blood pressure medication lasix higher than the metro rate for nearly five months – through the end of 2020.

The number of new s in rural counties grew by 17% last week, to 189,183 – the highest number since early January. Metro s grew by 8%, to about blood pressure medication lasix 870,000 new cases. The rural rate – which is expressed as new cases per 1,000 residents – was 411 last week. The metropolitan blood pressure medication lasix rate was 308. The higher rate comes just as rural America surpassed 100,000 total deaths from hypertension medications.

The current death toll among rural Americans stands at 101,035 blood pressure medication lasix. Last week, 1,779 rural Americans died from hypertension medications, an increase of about 18% from two weeks ago. Rural residents who contract hypertension medications are slightly blood pressure medication lasix more likely to die from the illness than metropolitan residents. While rural residents account for about 14.4% of all s, they represent 16.2% of the nation’s hypertension medications-related deaths. Previous studies have pointed to blood pressure medication lasix several factors that could raise risk for rural populations, including age and complicating conditions such as type 2 diabetes.

Like this story?. Sign up for our newsletter. This week’s report covers Sunday, August blood pressure medication lasix 22, through Saturday, August 28. Data is from USA Facts. The Deep South remained the regional hotspot for the blood pressure medication lasix current surge, which is driven by the highly contagious Delta variant.

But rates are up across the nation.Nine out of every 10 U.S. Counties are blood pressure medication lasix on the red-zone list, meaning they have a weekly rate of at least 100 new cases per 100,000. The White House hypertension task force has advised local governments to take additional mitigation measures when rates reach this level.Just two months ago, less than a fifth of U.S. Counties were on the red-zone list.Fourteen states have blood pressure medication lasix all their rural counties in the red zone. (On the map, the red zone includes red [rural] and light red [metro] counties, plus black [rural] and gray [metro].

Black and gray counties have very high rates of – 500 or more new cases per 100,000 blood pressure medication lasix residents for the week.)An additional 12 states have more than 90% of their rural counties on the red-zone list.Just nine states (all but two of which are in the South) account for half of all new rural s last week. These are Texas (14,822 new rural s), Kentucky (14,635), Mississippi (11,701), Tennessee (11,701), North Carolina (10,829), Georgia (9,483), Indiana (7,520), Florida (7,222), and Ohio (7,071.)Florida had the nation’s worst rural rate, at more than 1,000 new cases per 100,000 residents. That means the equivalent of 1% of rural Florida contracted hypertension medications in just the last blood pressure medication lasix week.Kentucky was second highest, with a rural rate of 801 per 100,000, followed by Tennessee with 768 per 100,000. (Roll over the statewide map to see information on rural rates and more.)Connecticut, which has only one rural county, had the best new rate – 119 per 100,000 – still high enough to be in the red zone.Other New England states also had low rural rates of compared to the rest of the U.S. Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont, which are also near the blood pressure medication lasix top of the list in vaccination rates, had the next best rural rates of .

Michigan had the fifth best rate, followed by Massachusetts. You Might Also Like.

Explore a full-page http://moneysavvyteen.com/lasix-pill-cost map Exactly one year after the rural hypertension medications rate first exceeded the urban rate, rural counties have moved back lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost to the front edge of the lasix. The rate of new s last week was a third higher in rural counties than urban ones, a Daily Yonder analysis shows. The current trend began the week lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost of August 14.

The last time the rural rate of new s was this much higher than the metro rate was the second week of August 2020. After surpassing the metro rate for the first time that week, the rural rate of new s remained higher than the metro lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost rate for nearly five months – through the end of 2020. The number of new s in rural counties grew by 17% last week, to 189,183 – the highest number since early January.

Metro s grew by 8%, to lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost about 870,000 new cases. The rural rate – which is expressed as new cases per 1,000 residents – was 411 last week. The metropolitan rate was lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost 308.

The higher rate comes just as rural America surpassed 100,000 total deaths from hypertension medications. The current death lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost toll among rural Americans stands at 101,035. Last week, 1,779 rural Americans died from hypertension medications, an increase of about 18% from two weeks ago.

Rural residents who contract hypertension medications are slightly more likely to die from lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost the illness than metropolitan residents. While rural residents account for about 14.4% of all s, they represent 16.2% of the nation’s hypertension medications-related deaths. Previous studies have pointed to several factors that could raise risk for rural lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost populations, including age and complicating conditions such as type 2 diabetes.

Like this story?. Sign up for our newsletter. This week’s lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost report covers Sunday, August 22, through Saturday, August 28.

Data is from USA Facts. The Deep South remained the regional hotspot for the current surge, which is driven by the lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost highly contagious Delta variant. But rates are up across the nation.Nine out of every 10 U.S.

Counties are on the red-zone list, meaning they have a weekly rate of at lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost least 100 new cases per 100,000. The White House hypertension task force has advised local governments to take additional mitigation measures when rates reach this level.Just two months ago, less than a fifth of U.S. Counties were on the red-zone list.Fourteen states have lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost all their rural counties in the red zone.

(On the map, the red zone includes red [rural] and light red [metro] counties, plus black [rural] and gray [metro]. Black and gray counties have very high rates of – 500 or more new cases per 100,000 residents for the week.)An additional 12 states have more than 90% of their rural counties on the red-zone list.Just nine states (all but two of which are in the South) account for half of all new rural s lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost last week. These are Texas (14,822 new rural s), Kentucky (14,635), Mississippi (11,701), Tennessee (11,701), North Carolina (10,829), Georgia (9,483), Indiana (7,520), Florida (7,222), and Ohio (7,071.)Florida had the nation’s worst rural rate, at more than 1,000 new cases per 100,000 residents.

That means the equivalent of 1% of rural Florida contracted hypertension medications in just the last week.Kentucky was second highest, with a rural rate of 801 per 100,000, followed by Tennessee with 768 per 100,000. (Roll over the statewide map to see information on rural rates and more.)Connecticut, which has only one rural county, had the best new rate – 119 per 100,000 – still high enough to be in the red zone.Other New England states also had low rural rates of compared to the rest of the U.S. Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont, which are also near the top of the list in vaccination rates, had the next best rural rates of .

Michigan had the fifth best rate, followed by Massachusetts. You Might Also Like.

Lasix nursing implications

Patients are more likely to experience preventable harm during perioperative care than in any other type of lasix nursing implications healthcare encounter.1 2 For several decades, a hallmark of surgical quality and safety has been the use of checklists to prevent errors (eg, wrong site surgery) and assure that key tasks have been or will be performed. The most widely used lasix nursing implications approach globally is the Surgical Safety Checklist (SSC) recommended by the WHO.3 It is divided into preinduction (or sign in, consisting of seven items performed by anaesthesia and nursing), preincision (timeout, 10 items performed by the entire team) and postsurgery (sign out, five items by the entire team).4 5 Most hospitals in the developed world perform the SSC or an equivalent timeout prior to surgical incision. However, preinduction briefings, and postcase debriefings in particular, are much less commonly performed.6 7There are widely disseminated arguments recommending the use of checklists in healthcare8 but also recognised limitations.9 Checklist-based preincision timeouts appear to improve surgical outcomes in many settings,4 5 yet, in other hospitals, the introduction of the SSC failed to improve outcomes.10 Like all tools or processes intended to improve safety, ineffective implementation will reduce the desired benefits. For example, there is appreciable evidence showing that surgical teams skip or do not meaningfully respond to timeout checklist items.11 12 Even with a robust implementation, effectiveness can be weakened by contextual factors, failure of leadership or deficient safety lasix nursing implications culture.Despite numerous studies, gaps in the evidence to guide optimal checklist use persist.

For example, we do not know whether checklist-based timeouts only decrease the occurrence of the undesirable events targeted by the checklist or, as many hypothesise, whether their use also facilitates teamwork and interprofessional communication. Although there is increasing guidance on how to optimally implement checklists at the local level, many questions remain.13 Moreover, we still do not understand the circumstances in which checklist use facilitates the detection, reporting and correction of errors.In lasix nursing implications this issue of the journal, Muensterer and colleagues14 describe a clever study in which the attending surgeon intentionally introduced errors during the preincision timeout while a medical student in the operating theatre surreptitiously noted whether the error was detected and reported by one or more members of the surgical team. If the error was not verbalised, the attending surgeon corrected the error before the timeout was complete. The single error embedded in each of 120 of 1800 paediatric operations was lasix nursing implications randomly chosen from among wrong patient name, age, gender, allergy or surgical procedure, side or site.

Overall, only about half (65. 54%) of all errors were detected and reported by a team member prior to surgeon correction lasix nursing implications. Of these, errors were most commonly reported by the anaesthesiologist (64%) and almost never by residents in training (6%) or medical students (1%).This study also has important limitations. Because the investigators were leading the timeouts as part of a research study, lasix nursing implications adherence to all of the checklist items was reportedly 100%.

Yet, few organisations consistently attain timeout adherence above 90%.11 Since you are less likely to catch an error if you do not address that item during the timeout, in institutions with lower adherence, the proportion of missed errors may be even higher.The authors, with input from their institutional review board, designed the study to be feasible and compliant with established human subjects protection principles. As such, the attending surgeon always corrected the error after the anaesthesiologist’s component of the timeout but before the nurses’ component lasix nursing implications. By excluding the part of the timeout when the nurses address their checklist items (eg, instruments are sterile,) followed by a final opportunity as the timeout ends to note any errors or concerns, the study may have underestimated the rate of error reporting.Because the study did not query team members individually after the timeout, we also do not know how many errors were detected but not annunciated. For example, recognised lasix nursing implications errors that were attributed to ‘misspeaking’ and/or had no clinical significance may not have been verbally challenged.

Moreover, as is discussed by the authors, there was an unequivocal hierarchy effect—individuals with the least ‘power’ (ie, low in hierarchy within the current healthcare culture) were the least likely to report the error.This study highlights two important safety relevant questions on which I will elaborate. First, why and how should we change lasix nursing implications healthcare culture to facilitate ‘speaking up’?. Second, how can we best design and implement checklists and other safety interventions to yield more consistent and sustained clinician behaviour change?. The continued problem of hierarchical culture in healthcareThe significant influence of hierarchy on the incidence of error reporting in Muensterer et al’s14 study is consistent with substantial prior evidence that lower hierarchy clinical providers are less likely to ‘speak up’, even when they are aware of major safety violations.15–17Failure of a subordinate copilot to challenge or speak up to the captain lasix nursing implications in the 1977 Tenerife disaster was the impetus for the aviation industry’s adoption of crew resource management (CRM).

Healthcare team-training initiatives like the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s TeamSTEPPS now include tools such as the ‘two-challenge rule’ and emphasise speaking up.18 Flattened hierarchies and reliance on expertise rather than seniority, especially during crisis or stress, are an integral component of high-reliability organisations. In contrast, the persistent hierarchical culture of healthcare lasix nursing implications is anathema to positive safety attitudes and behaviours. This is particularly problematic in operating theatres where surgeons view themselves as ‘captain of the ship’ and where uncivil behaviour is tolerated.19 The insidious effects of hierarchy will impair effectiveness of checklist use and predispose to safety issues in all aspects of routine and emergency care.20 While team-oriented training designed to enhance the ability of lower hierarchy clinicians to ‘speak up’ can be effective,21 22 evidence to guide the design and implementation of these interventions is still sparse. Single training exposures have generally had limited lasix nursing implications effects,17 23 in part likely due to inadequate ‘potency’ to achieve the desired effect24 in a clinical environment contaminated by the hierarchical culture and in part because most interventions have focused on ‘assertiveness’ training for the less powerful members of the team rather than, or in addition to, sensitivity or receptivity training of the most powerful (eg, surgical attendings).17Discussions of power hierarchy to date have largely focused on clinicians’ professional roles (ie, nurse vs physician) and level of experience (eg, resident vs attending).

Even with two attending physicians, for example, a surgeon and anaesthesiologist, power dynamics can degrade communication and decrease team performance. In a multicentre study of experienced anaesthesiologists managing simulated crisis events, the anaesthesiologists’ failure to lasix nursing implications challenge the surgeon to initiate life-saving interventions (eg, to open the abdomen in the presence of an enlarging retroperitoneal haematoma during laparoscopic surgery, or to halt surgery to cardiovert an unstable patient) was associated with lower overall scenario performance scores as determined by trained blinded anaesthesiologist video raters.25In fact, hierarchy is much more complex and this may explain in part the variable and generally weak results seen in ‘speaking up’ intervention studies to date. When considering hierarchical effects on communication assertiveness, one must also consider individual characteristics including gender, race/ethnicity, language, personal cultural background and personality, as well as the personality of those in higher power roles, microclimate factors of the team and care unit, and overall organisational culture.17 22 An interesting direction for future study is the facilitation of more positive communication (eg, expressions of gratitude or encouragement).26In a single-site intervention study to improve the quality of handovers from anaesthesia professionals to postanaesthesia care unit (PACU) nurses,27 simulation-based training emphasised specific dyadic communication behaviours—assertiveness for the nurses when their needs were not being met and ‘sensitivity’ (or receptiveness) for the anaesthesia professionals when the nurses raised concerns. In poststudy interviews, this behavioural focus was lasix nursing implications considered an important contributor to the resulting sustained improvement in the quality of actual handovers.

As part of this study, we explicitly taught participants to CUSS. CUSS is lasix nursing implications a graduated approach to facilitate speaking up. The acronym stands for ‘I’m Concerned’, ‘I’m Uncomfortable’, ‘This is a Safety issue’ and ‘Stop!. €™.

The intended learners were taught these ‘triggers’ for eliciting desired behaviours (ie, to stop what they are doing and have a conversation with the initiator) and this approach creates an environment where the initiating individual can receive support from others who overhear the conversation—‘Doctor, I hear that Maria is CUSSing at you?. How can I help to resolve this situation?. €™ Such a graded assertiveness approach to ‘stop the line’, developed in other industries, is increasingly being used throughout healthcare.28Designing and implementing more effective safety tools and processesSSCs are just one tool used to advance overall perioperative system safety. Similarly, in commercial aviation, checklists are one tool used as part of CRM to assure operational safety.

CRM is a philosophy or construct that includes explicit values and principles, procedures supported by purpose-designed checklists and other tools, and regularly scheduled mandatory simulation-based training and assessment that together contribute to an existing safety culture in pilots and across the organisation.29 CRM and most of the existing aviation safety system were iteratively designed by pilots (the front-line workers) in collaboration with other stakeholders (including regulators). Healthcare must employ similar human-centred design approaches to re-engineer our safety systems.For commercial aviation to be completely safe, no planes would fly. Similarly, safety will never be the foremost system objective in healthcare. The primary goal is to efficiently deliver cost-effective care.

Instead, in any high-consequence industry, safety is a desirable by-product (an ‘emergent feature’) of a system designed to achieve primary operational goals. In healthcare, sick patients must be treated and there is inherent risk in doing so.30 Achieving societally acceptable levels of safety will stem from a deliberately designed system founded on a strong safety culture and truly committed leadership.With this as background, it is not surprising that so many hospitals struggle to garner reliable and sustained benefit from the use of checklists and other safety tools. To understand what is required, I would like to draw parallels with anaesthesiology’s experience of implementing another type of checklist.The Food and Drug Administration Anesthesia Machine Pre-Use ChecklistThe earliest checklist used in healthcare to reduce adverse events is the anaesthesia equipment preuse checklist, developed in 1987 by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in collaboration with the Anesthesia Patient Safety Foundation and the American Society of Anesthesiologists.31 After more than three decades of use, lessons learnt from the use of the FDA checklist parallel more recent experiences with SSCs, and are instructive to a more general understanding of the role of safety tools in healthcare (see table 1).View this table:Table 1 Lessons learnt from 30 years of personal experience with and reflection about the Anesthesia Equipment Pre-Use Checklist*A checklist alone is insufficient to achieve optimal resultsHospitals that get the best results from an SSC implementation are often well-resourced organisations that already have safety-oriented committed leadership, a strong safety culture, educated and engaged front-line clinicians and an established track record of successfully implementing other safety interventions.32 That said, any hospital, given adequate commitment, resources and expertise, can implement an SSC or other substantive safety intervention successfully. In doing so, it will educate and engage its workers, improve its safety culture and set the stage for further safety and quality improvements.A multimodal approach to safety interventions is more effective.

Hospitals that were able to successfully implement all three components of the SSC saw greater reductions in postoperative complications.33 Similarly, the combination of the SSC with a complementary approach that more fully addresses preoperative and postoperative issues, the Surgical Patient Safety System, was associated with better postoperative outcomes than use of the WHO SSC alone.34 The most effective interventions are those that are based on an integrated conceptual framework and follow human factor principles, especially when the safety goals are multiple or diverse.35In our PACU handover improvement project mentioned earlier,27 the multimodal intervention produced a fourfold improvement in observed clinician behaviours (ie, conduct of actual handovers) that was sustained for at least 3 years after the intervention ceased. The project began by getting perioperative leadership buy-in, conducting observations of the current handover process and engaging front-line clinicians in all phases of study development. The criteria for an ‘acceptable handover’ were chosen by an independent team of clinicians. Front-line clinicians first completed a multimedia introductory webinar that included key principles and a knowledge assessment.

To attend the 2-hour simulation training session, both anaesthesia professionals and PACU nurses were relieved from regular clinical duties (a strong message that this was an organisational priority). A custom patient-specific electronic form was available at every bedside in the PACU to reinforce the training during actual handovers. Performance feedback was provided to individuals, units and perioperative leadership. The number of components needed for successful safety interventions will depend on the behaviour change desired, the existing safety culture, current experience and expertise of the intended end users and the priority articulated by organisational leaders.

Regardless, design and implementation must be based on a solid conceptual framework, consider the full life-cycle of the intervention (from conceptualisation to obsolescence) and employ human factors engineering and implementation science principles and tools.13ConclusionChecklists and other safety tools are potentially valuable tools to advance perioperative safety. However, when used in isolation or implemented incorrectly, checklists have significant limitations. Safety initiatives that take a systems-oriented multimodal approach to design and implementation can, with organisational leadership and determination, produce both targeted and more general safety improvement.Ethics statementsPatient consent for publicationNot required.Many patients admitted to hospital require venous access to infuse medications and fluids. The most commonly used device, the peripheral venous catheter, ranges from 2.5 to 4.5 cm in length, and is typically used for less than 5 days.

The midline, a relatively newer peripheral venous catheter, is up to 20 cm in length, but does not reach the central veins, and may be used for up to 2 weeks. A peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC) is a longer catheter that is placed in one of the arm veins and extends to reach the central veins. The PICC is used for longer periods of time compared with peripheral intravenous devices, and initially gained popularity as a convenient vascular access device used in the outpatient and home settings. Its premise has been to provide access that lasts for weeks, that is fairly safe and easily manageable.

Patients often require central venous access when hospitalised, with more than half of patients in intensive care, and up to 20% in those cared for in the non-intensive care wards.1 Common indications for PICC use in the acute care setting include the requirement for multiple and frequent infusions (eg, antibiotics, parenteral nutrition), the administration of medications incompatible with peripheral infusion, invasive haemodynamic monitoring in critically ill patients, very poor venous access and frequent need for blood draws.2 Specially trained healthcare workers place PICCs, often nurses from a vascular access team (VAT), or interventional radiologists. The VAT is comprised of skilled nurses, with either medical/surgical, emergency department or intensive care unit backgrounds. Contrary to other healthcare workers that place PICCs, the VAT’s primary function is to place PICCs, and optimise the infusion delivery, through a safe and effective process. Its scope includes assessment for need, peripheral and central device insertion, monitoring of use and removal.3In their study of five hospitals within the Veterans Administration (VA) healthcare systems in the USA, Krein et al4 underscore the importance of a formal VAT to formulate and implement explicit appropriateness criteria, ensure timely insertion and safe management and direct patient education around PICC use.

They found that team structures supporting line placement vary across hospitals from a dedicated team, to individual nurses trained in placement, to hospitals where only interventional radiologists insert PICCs. The presence of a VAT was associated with more defined criteria for PICC use, but a recurrent theme was inadequate interdisciplinary dialogue. Although qualitative data were gathered at five VA hospitals only, the study’s findings reflect the variation in PICC placement and use, whether in academic or community, small or large hospitals.An important factor in variation in the approach to PICC line placement and management is the availability of resources and expertise at the hospital site. For example, if healthcare workers have suboptimal skills to place peripheral venous catheters, including midlines,5 clinicians may resort to ordering more PICCs unnecessarily to fill that void.

Furthermore, as revealed in Krein’s study, a hospital that does not have the expertise to learn about alternative devices, such as those with lower risks and shorter dwell times (eg, midlines), may resort to using more PICCs than necessary. Similarly, hospitals without clinicians skilled or comfortable placing other central lines6 may rely more on using PICCs. In addition, the lack of an available VAT to place PICCs using uasound guidance may result in more referrals to interventional radiology for placement, potentially exposing the patient to avoidable radiation during fluoroscopy.7We propose an approach to improve the appropriate and safe use of PICCs by focusing on three elements that address the findings by Krein and colleagues. Establishing a structure powered by a VAT.

Anchoring a standardised process for line selection, insertion and care. And promoting adoption by engagement with the key stakeholders.Establishing a structure to support placement and management of PICCs depends on whether the number of devices placed is enough to support the creation of a dedicated vascular access programme. Leadership plays a critical role to invest the resources for a functional VAT, understanding the financial and quality benefits associated.8 Not realising its value, hospital leaders may view the VAT as a non-revenue-generating service, putting it at risk when considering cost reduction strategies. The value of the VAT expands from mitigating preventable events (eg, deep venous thrombosis, ) to enhancing patient experience (eg, less attempts to place a peripheral device).9 In addition, better outcomes help curb the financial risks (eg, hospital-acquired condition penalties)8 and improve hospital ratings.

The VAT’s role encompasses placing PICCs and guaranteeing the proper selection of the intravascular device and its appropriate use.2The second element involves standardising processes for line selection and care, regardless of who is taking care of the device. Implementing policies to address indications, placement and maintenance and using standardised kits help minimise variation. The creation of policies should be achieved through a multidisciplinary approach with VAT, nurses and physicians. The VAT can act as the ‘gate keeper’ evaluating whether the reason for PICC placement is aligned with indications.

In addition, the VAT plays a critical role supporting nurses’ competencies for venous catheter use (eg, aseptic access and maintenance, addressing complications and mitigating risk)10 to reduce mechanical11 and infectious complications.12 The VAT performs regular rounds to mitigate process gaps (eg, dressing site intactness) and to identify complications (eg, PICC site erythema or drainage, arm swelling), and provides timely feedback on clinical performance. The VAT can also serve as subject matter experts to the ordering physicians for the appropriate device type, based on vessel size and indications for use, how many lumens, site selection and a de-escalation plan for the patient prior to discharge. It also provides services should a device-related complication occur (eg, clotting), and works with clinicians to remedy the issue and salvage the device, thereby preventing a patient from losing their vascular access and/or having to replace it.The last element, and perhaps most significant, is to enhance the adoption of best practices through a partnership with the key stakeholders. PICC-associated outcomes are not only owned by the VAT, rather it is the responsibility of the clinicians, physicians and nurses to achieve those goals (table 1).

Physicians are an essential stakeholder group to engage as they are the ones responsible for ordering the PICC. An identified physician champion who partners and empowers the VAT will help resolve any barriers and be a liaison with the local physician community.13 The ideal physician champion should have the respect of peers, understand process optimisation and promote quality improvement. They need to be well versed on the appropriate indications for PICC use, the associated complications and risks and alternatives to the device. The physician champion engages the leaders of the key disciplines responsible for requesting a PICC, educating them on the appropriate indications for use, the outcomes associated with PICC use, inviting them to be partners and responding to any of their concerns.View this table:Table 1 Disciplines and their support to mitigate PICC harmWhat about the key physician disciplines to engage?.

Physicians can play an active role in enhancing PICC use through avoiding the unnecessary use of infusions. The consultation of infectious diseases specialists for intravenous antibiotic use appropriateness has been associated with less PICC use and lower complications.14 Similarly, having a surgeon support the decision for whether enteral or parenteral nutrition is needed will help reduce unnecessary device use.15 Disciplines like hospitalists or general internists care for a large number of patients and often order PICCs for venous access,16 while nephrologists may advocate avoiding the use of PICCs in the chronic kidney disease population in an effort for vein preservation.17 In hospitals with teaching programmes, the VAT and its physician champion may educate physicians in training on device choice, placement and duration of use, and address with their faculty competencies for line management.18 Engaging these disciplines, elucidating the indications for appropriate use and providing feedback and local data on the potential harm ensure accountability and further attention to PICC safety.In summary, the PICC is one of the primary solutions to achieve vascular access. With up to one in five patients at risk for developing complications,19 it is incumbent on us to ensure that these devices are properly used and maintained. Identifying and overcoming system barriers are key to delivering sustainable safe outcomes.

As a first step, clinical and administrative leaders, realising the financial and quality benefits, need to support the structure reflected by the VAT to enhance PICC care. Second, the VAT must partner with disciplines (particularly nursing) to promote and ensure adequate competencies for placement and maintenance. Finally, clinical disciplines caring for the patient should instil a collaborative environment for better decision-making on when central access is required, and what device provides the safest and most effective delivery of care.Ethics statementsPatient consent for publicationNot required..

Patients are more likely to experience preventable harm during perioperative care than in any other type of healthcare encounter.1 2 For several decades, a hallmark of surgical quality and safety has been the use of checklists to prevent http://taoshub.com/portfolio-en/ errors (eg, wrong site surgery) and assure that key lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost tasks have been or will be performed. The most widely used approach globally is the Surgical Safety Checklist (SSC) recommended by the WHO.3 It is divided into preinduction (or sign in, consisting of seven items performed by anaesthesia and nursing), preincision (timeout, 10 items performed by the entire lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost team) and postsurgery (sign out, five items by the entire team).4 5 Most hospitals in the developed world perform the SSC or an equivalent timeout prior to surgical incision. However, preinduction briefings, and postcase debriefings in particular, are much less commonly performed.6 7There are widely disseminated arguments recommending the use of checklists in healthcare8 but also recognised limitations.9 Checklist-based preincision timeouts appear to improve surgical outcomes in many settings,4 5 yet, in other hospitals, the introduction of the SSC failed to improve outcomes.10 Like all tools or processes intended to improve safety, ineffective implementation will reduce the desired benefits.

For example, there is appreciable evidence showing that surgical teams skip or do not meaningfully respond to timeout checklist items.11 12 Even with a robust implementation, effectiveness can be weakened by contextual factors, failure of leadership or deficient safety culture.Despite numerous studies, gaps in the evidence to guide lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost optimal checklist use persist. For example, we do not know whether checklist-based timeouts only decrease the occurrence of the undesirable events targeted by the checklist or, as many hypothesise, whether their use also facilitates teamwork and interprofessional communication. Although there is increasing guidance on how to optimally implement checklists at the local level, many questions remain.13 Moreover, we still do not understand the circumstances in which checklist use facilitates the detection, reporting and correction of errors.In this issue of the journal, Muensterer and colleagues14 describe a clever study in which the attending surgeon intentionally introduced errors during the preincision timeout while a medical student in the operating theatre surreptitiously noted whether the error was detected and reported by one or more members of lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost the surgical team.

If the error was not verbalised, the attending surgeon corrected the error before the timeout was complete. The single error embedded in each of 120 of lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost 1800 paediatric operations was randomly chosen from among wrong patient name, age, gender, allergy or surgical procedure, side or site. Overall, only about half (65.

54%) of all errors were detected and lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost reported by a team member prior to surgeon correction. Of these, errors were most commonly reported by the anaesthesiologist (64%) and almost never by residents in training (6%) or medical students (1%).This study also has important limitations. Because the investigators were leading the timeouts as part of a research study, adherence to all lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost of the checklist items was reportedly 100%.

Yet, few organisations consistently attain timeout adherence above 90%.11 Since you are less likely to catch an error if you do not address that item during the timeout, in institutions with lower adherence, the proportion of missed errors may be even higher.The authors, with input from their institutional review board, designed the study to be feasible and compliant with established human subjects protection principles. As such, the attending surgeon always corrected the error after the anaesthesiologist’s component of the timeout lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost but before the nurses’ component. By excluding the part of the timeout when the nurses address their checklist items (eg, instruments are sterile,) followed by a final opportunity as the timeout ends to note any errors or concerns, the study may have underestimated the rate of error reporting.Because the study did not query team members individually after the timeout, we also do not know how many errors were detected but not annunciated.

For example, recognised errors that were attributed to ‘misspeaking’ and/or had no clinical significance may not lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost have been verbally challenged. Moreover, as is discussed by the authors, there was an unequivocal hierarchy effect—individuals with the least ‘power’ (ie, low in hierarchy within the current healthcare culture) were the least likely to report the error.This study highlights two important safety relevant questions on which I will elaborate. First, why and how should we change healthcare culture lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost to facilitate ‘speaking up’?.

Second, how can we best design and implement checklists and other safety interventions to yield more consistent and sustained clinician behaviour change?. The continued problem of hierarchical culture in healthcareThe significant lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost influence of hierarchy on the incidence of error reporting in Muensterer et al’s14 study is consistent with substantial prior evidence that lower hierarchy clinical providers are less likely to ‘speak up’, even when they are aware of major safety violations.15–17Failure of a subordinate copilot to challenge or speak up to the captain in the 1977 Tenerife disaster was the impetus for the aviation industry’s adoption of crew resource management (CRM). Healthcare team-training initiatives like the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s TeamSTEPPS now include tools such as the ‘two-challenge rule’ and emphasise speaking up.18 Flattened hierarchies and reliance on expertise rather than seniority, especially during crisis or stress, are an integral component of high-reliability organisations.

In contrast, the persistent hierarchical culture of healthcare is anathema to positive safety attitudes lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost and behaviours. This is particularly problematic in operating theatres where surgeons view themselves as ‘captain of the ship’ and where uncivil behaviour is tolerated.19 The insidious effects of hierarchy will impair effectiveness of checklist use and predispose to safety issues in all aspects of routine and emergency care.20 While team-oriented training designed to enhance the ability of lower hierarchy clinicians to ‘speak up’ can be effective,21 22 evidence to guide the design and implementation of these interventions is still sparse. Single training exposures have generally had limited effects,17 23 in part likely due to inadequate ‘potency’ to achieve the desired effect24 in a clinical environment contaminated by the hierarchical culture and in part because most interventions have focused on ‘assertiveness’ training for the less powerful members of the team rather than, or in addition to, sensitivity or receptivity training lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost of the most powerful (eg, surgical attendings).17Discussions of power hierarchy to date have largely focused on clinicians’ professional roles (ie, nurse vs physician) and level of experience (eg, resident vs attending).

Even with two attending physicians, for example, a surgeon and anaesthesiologist, power dynamics can degrade communication and decrease team performance. In a lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost multicentre study of experienced anaesthesiologists managing simulated crisis events, the anaesthesiologists’ failure to challenge the surgeon to initiate life-saving interventions (eg, to open the abdomen in the presence of an enlarging retroperitoneal haematoma during laparoscopic surgery, or to halt surgery to cardiovert an unstable patient) was associated with lower overall scenario performance scores as determined by trained blinded anaesthesiologist video raters.25In fact, hierarchy is much more complex and this may explain in part the variable and generally weak results seen in ‘speaking up’ intervention studies to date. When considering hierarchical effects on communication assertiveness, one must also consider individual characteristics including gender, race/ethnicity, language, personal cultural background and personality, as well as the personality of those in higher power roles, microclimate factors of the team and care unit, and overall organisational culture.17 22 An interesting direction for future study is the facilitation of more positive communication (eg, expressions of gratitude or encouragement).26In a single-site intervention study to improve the quality of handovers from anaesthesia professionals to postanaesthesia care unit (PACU) nurses,27 simulation-based training emphasised specific dyadic communication behaviours—assertiveness for the nurses when their needs were not being met and ‘sensitivity’ (or receptiveness) for the anaesthesia professionals when the nurses raised concerns.

In poststudy lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost interviews, this behavioural focus was considered an important contributor to the resulting sustained improvement in the quality of actual handovers. As part of this study, we explicitly taught participants to CUSS. CUSS is a graduated lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost approach to facilitate speaking up.

The acronym stands for ‘I’m Concerned’, ‘I’m Uncomfortable’, ‘This is a Safety issue’ and ‘Stop!. €™. The intended learners were taught these ‘triggers’ for eliciting desired behaviours (ie, to stop what they are doing and have a conversation with the initiator) and this approach creates an environment where the initiating individual can receive support from others who overhear the conversation—‘Doctor, I hear that Maria is CUSSing at you?.

How can I help to resolve this situation?. €™ Such a graded assertiveness approach to ‘stop the line’, developed in other industries, is increasingly being used throughout healthcare.28Designing and implementing more effective safety tools and processesSSCs are just one tool used to advance overall perioperative system safety. Similarly, in commercial aviation, checklists are one tool used as part of CRM to assure operational safety.

CRM is a philosophy or construct that includes explicit values and principles, procedures supported by purpose-designed checklists and other tools, and regularly scheduled mandatory simulation-based training and assessment that together contribute to an existing safety culture in pilots and across the organisation.29 CRM and most of the existing aviation safety system were iteratively designed by pilots (the front-line workers) in collaboration with other stakeholders (including regulators). Healthcare must employ similar human-centred design approaches to re-engineer our safety systems.For commercial aviation to be completely safe, no planes would fly. Similarly, safety will never be the foremost system objective in healthcare.

The primary goal is to efficiently deliver cost-effective care. Instead, in any high-consequence industry, safety is a desirable by-product (an ‘emergent feature’) of a system designed to achieve primary operational goals. In healthcare, sick patients must be treated and there is inherent risk in doing so.30 Achieving societally acceptable levels of safety will stem from a deliberately designed system founded on a strong safety culture and truly committed leadership.With this as background, it is not surprising that so many hospitals struggle to garner reliable and sustained benefit from the use of checklists and other safety tools.

To understand what is required, I would like to draw parallels with anaesthesiology’s experience of implementing another type of checklist.The Food and Drug Administration Anesthesia Machine Pre-Use ChecklistThe earliest checklist used in healthcare to reduce adverse events is the anaesthesia equipment preuse checklist, developed in 1987 by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in collaboration with the Anesthesia Patient Safety Foundation and the American Society of Anesthesiologists.31 After more than three decades of use, lessons learnt from the use of the FDA checklist parallel more recent experiences with SSCs, and are instructive to a more general understanding of the role of safety tools in healthcare (see table 1).View this table:Table 1 Lessons learnt from 30 years of personal experience with and reflection about the Anesthesia Equipment Pre-Use Checklist*A checklist alone is insufficient to achieve optimal resultsHospitals that get the best results from an SSC implementation are often well-resourced organisations that already have safety-oriented committed leadership, a strong safety culture, educated and engaged front-line clinicians and an established track record of successfully implementing other safety interventions.32 That said, any hospital, given adequate commitment, resources and expertise, can implement an SSC or other substantive safety intervention successfully. In doing so, it will educate and engage its workers, improve its safety culture and set the stage for further safety and quality improvements.A multimodal approach to safety interventions is more effective. Hospitals that were able to successfully implement all three components of the SSC saw greater reductions in postoperative complications.33 Similarly, the combination of the SSC with a complementary approach that more fully addresses preoperative and postoperative issues, the Surgical Patient Safety System, was associated with better postoperative outcomes than use of the WHO SSC alone.34 The most effective interventions are those that are based on an integrated conceptual framework and follow human factor principles, especially when the safety goals are multiple or diverse.35In our PACU handover improvement project mentioned earlier,27 the multimodal intervention produced a fourfold improvement in observed clinician behaviours (ie, conduct of actual handovers) that was sustained for at least 3 years after the intervention ceased.

The project began by getting perioperative leadership buy-in, conducting observations of the current handover process and engaging front-line clinicians in all phases of study development. The criteria for an ‘acceptable handover’ were chosen by an independent team of clinicians. Front-line clinicians first completed a multimedia introductory webinar that included key principles and a knowledge assessment.

To attend the 2-hour simulation training session, both anaesthesia professionals and PACU nurses were relieved from regular clinical duties (a strong message that this was an organisational priority). A custom patient-specific electronic form was available at every bedside in the PACU to reinforce the training during actual handovers. Performance feedback was provided to individuals, units and perioperative leadership.

The number of components needed for successful safety interventions will depend on the behaviour change desired, the existing safety culture, current experience and expertise of the intended end users and the priority articulated by organisational leaders. Regardless, design and implementation must be based on a solid conceptual framework, consider the full life-cycle of the intervention (from conceptualisation to obsolescence) and employ human factors engineering and implementation science principles and tools.13ConclusionChecklists and other safety tools are potentially valuable tools to advance perioperative safety. However, when used in isolation or implemented incorrectly, checklists have significant limitations.

Safety initiatives that take a systems-oriented multimodal approach to design and implementation can, with organisational leadership and determination, produce both targeted and more general safety improvement.Ethics statementsPatient consent for publicationNot required.Many patients admitted to hospital require venous access to infuse medications and fluids. The most commonly used device, the peripheral venous catheter, ranges from 2.5 to 4.5 cm in length, and is typically used for less than 5 days. The midline, a relatively newer peripheral venous catheter, is up to 20 cm in length, but does not reach the central veins, and may be used for up to 2 weeks.

A peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC) is a longer catheter that is placed in one of the arm veins and extends to reach the central veins. The PICC is used for longer periods of time compared with peripheral intravenous devices, and initially gained popularity as a convenient vascular access device used in the outpatient and home settings. Its premise has been to provide access that lasts for weeks, that is fairly safe and easily manageable.

Patients often require central venous access when hospitalised, with more than half of patients in intensive care, and up to 20% in those cared for in the non-intensive care wards.1 Common indications for PICC use in the acute care setting include the requirement for multiple and frequent infusions (eg, antibiotics, parenteral nutrition), the administration of medications incompatible with peripheral infusion, invasive haemodynamic monitoring in critically ill patients, very poor venous access and frequent need for blood draws.2 Specially trained healthcare workers place PICCs, often nurses from a vascular access team (VAT), or interventional radiologists. The VAT is comprised of skilled nurses, with either medical/surgical, emergency department or intensive care unit backgrounds. Contrary to other healthcare workers that place PICCs, the VAT’s primary function is to place PICCs, and optimise the infusion delivery, through a safe and effective process.

Its scope includes assessment for need, peripheral and central device insertion, monitoring of use and removal.3In their study of five hospitals within the Veterans Administration (VA) healthcare systems in the USA, Krein et al4 underscore the importance of a formal VAT to formulate and implement explicit appropriateness criteria, ensure timely insertion and safe management and direct patient education around PICC use. They found that team structures supporting line placement vary across hospitals from a dedicated team, to individual nurses trained in placement, to hospitals where only interventional radiologists insert PICCs. The presence of a VAT was associated with more defined criteria for PICC use, but a recurrent theme was inadequate interdisciplinary dialogue.

Although qualitative data were gathered at five VA hospitals only, the study’s findings reflect the variation in PICC placement and use, whether in academic or community, small or large hospitals.An important factor in variation in the approach to PICC line placement and management is the availability of resources and expertise at the hospital site. For example, if healthcare workers have suboptimal skills to place peripheral venous catheters, including midlines,5 clinicians may resort to ordering more PICCs unnecessarily to fill that void. Furthermore, as revealed in Krein’s study, a hospital that does not have the expertise to learn about alternative devices, such as those with lower risks and shorter dwell times (eg, midlines), may resort to using more PICCs than necessary.

Similarly, hospitals without clinicians skilled or comfortable placing other central lines6 may rely more on using PICCs. In addition, the lack of an available VAT to place PICCs using uasound guidance may result in more referrals to interventional radiology for placement, potentially exposing the patient to avoidable radiation during fluoroscopy.7We propose an approach to improve the appropriate and safe use of PICCs by focusing on three elements that address the findings by Krein and colleagues. Establishing a structure powered by a VAT.

Anchoring a standardised process for line selection, insertion and care. And promoting adoption by engagement with the key stakeholders.Establishing a structure to support placement and management of PICCs depends on whether the number of devices placed is enough to support the creation of a dedicated vascular access programme. Leadership plays a critical role to invest the resources for a functional VAT, understanding the financial and quality benefits associated.8 Not realising its value, hospital leaders may view the VAT as a non-revenue-generating service, putting it at risk when considering cost reduction strategies.

The value of the VAT expands from mitigating preventable events (eg, deep venous thrombosis, ) to enhancing patient experience (eg, less attempts to place a peripheral device).9 In addition, better outcomes help curb the financial risks (eg, hospital-acquired condition penalties)8 and improve hospital ratings. The VAT’s role encompasses placing PICCs and guaranteeing the proper selection of the intravascular device and its appropriate use.2The second element involves standardising processes for line selection and care, regardless of who is taking care of the device. Implementing policies to address indications, placement and maintenance and using standardised kits help minimise variation.

The creation of policies should be achieved through a multidisciplinary approach with VAT, nurses and physicians. The VAT can act as the ‘gate keeper’ evaluating whether the reason for PICC placement is aligned with indications. In addition, the VAT plays a critical role supporting nurses’ competencies for venous catheter use (eg, aseptic access and maintenance, addressing complications and mitigating risk)10 to reduce mechanical11 and infectious complications.12 The VAT performs regular rounds to mitigate process gaps (eg, dressing site intactness) and to identify complications (eg, PICC site erythema or drainage, arm swelling), and provides timely feedback on clinical performance.

The VAT can also serve as subject matter experts to the ordering physicians for the appropriate device type, based on vessel size and indications for use, how many lumens, site selection and a de-escalation plan for the patient prior to discharge. It also provides services should a device-related complication occur (eg, clotting), and works with clinicians to remedy the issue and salvage the device, thereby preventing a patient from losing their vascular access and/or having to replace it.The last element, and perhaps most significant, is to enhance the adoption of best practices through a partnership with the key stakeholders. PICC-associated outcomes are not only owned by the VAT, rather it is the responsibility of the clinicians, physicians and nurses to achieve those goals (table 1).

Physicians are an essential stakeholder group to engage as they are the ones responsible for ordering the PICC. An identified physician champion who partners and empowers the VAT will help resolve any barriers and be a liaison with the local physician community.13 The ideal physician champion should have the respect of peers, understand process optimisation and promote quality improvement. They need to be well versed on the appropriate indications for PICC use, the associated complications and risks and alternatives to the device.

The physician champion engages the leaders of the key disciplines responsible for requesting a PICC, educating them on the appropriate indications for use, the outcomes associated with PICC use, inviting them to be partners and responding to any of their concerns.View this table:Table 1 Disciplines and their support to mitigate PICC harmWhat about the key physician disciplines to engage?. Physicians can play an active role in enhancing PICC use through avoiding the unnecessary use of infusions. The consultation of infectious diseases specialists for intravenous antibiotic use appropriateness has been associated with less PICC use and lower complications.14 Similarly, having a surgeon support the decision for whether enteral or parenteral nutrition is needed will help reduce unnecessary device use.15 Disciplines like hospitalists or general internists care for a large number of patients and often order PICCs for venous access,16 while nephrologists may advocate avoiding the use of PICCs in the chronic kidney disease population in an effort for vein preservation.17 In hospitals with teaching programmes, the VAT and its physician champion may educate physicians in training on device choice, placement and duration of use, and address with their faculty competencies for line management.18 Engaging these disciplines, elucidating the indications for appropriate use and providing feedback and local data on the potential harm ensure accountability and further attention to PICC safety.In summary, the PICC is one of the primary solutions to achieve vascular access.

With up to one in five patients at risk for developing complications,19 it is incumbent on us to ensure that these devices are properly used and maintained. Identifying and overcoming system barriers are key to delivering sustainable safe outcomes. As a first step, clinical and administrative leaders, realising the financial and quality benefits, need to support the structure reflected by the VAT to enhance PICC care.

Second, the VAT must partner with disciplines (particularly nursing) to promote and ensure adequate competencies for placement and maintenance. Finally, clinical disciplines caring for the patient should instil a collaborative environment for better decision-making on when central access is required, and what device provides the safest and most effective delivery of care.Ethics statementsPatient consent for publicationNot required..

Will lasix show up on a drug test

hypertension medications impact on cisgender gay men and other will lasix show up on a drug test men who have sex with men (MSM) on a global scaleThe hypertension medications lasix is thought to disproportionately threaten the health of underserved and underinvestigated populations. To investigate the impact of hypertension medications transmission mitigation measures on MSM, an international team did a cross-sectional study that included 2732 will lasix show up on a drug test MSM from 103 countries who responded to a questionnaire distributed through a gay social networking app. Findings suggest that the spread of hypertension medications, and the global response to contain it, has variably disrupted economic, mental health, general health and clinical services among MSM populations, with a greater impact on those living with HIV, racial/ethnic minorities, immigrants, sex workers and socioeconomically disadvantaged groups. As hypertension medications may deepen health disparities and social inequalities, continued monitoring and creative strategies are needed to mitigate reduction in will lasix show up on a drug test access to services for MSM with intersecting vulnerabilities.Santos GM, Ackerman B, Rao A, et al. Economic, mental health, HIV prevention and HIV treatment impacts of hypertension medications and the hypertension medications response on a global sample of cisgender gay men and other men who have sex with men.

AIDS Beha will lasix show up on a drug test 2020. 11:1–11.https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-020-02969-0Influence of sexual positioning on syphilis acquisition and its stage at diagnosisIn a retrospective study of MSM in Melbourne, Australia, researchers examined the association between sexual positioning and a diagnosis of primary will lasix show up on a drug test (n=338) or secondary (n=221) syphilis. Of 247 penile chancres, 244 (98.7%) occurred in MSM who reported versatile or exclusive top sexual positioning. Of 77 anal chancres, will lasix show up on a drug test 75 (97.4%) occurred in MSM who reported versatile or exclusive bottom sexual positioning. MSM who practised receptive anal sex were more likely to present with secondary rather than primary syphilis (OR 3.90.

P<0.001, adjusted will lasix show up on a drug test for age, HIV status and condom use). This suggests that because anorectal chancres are less noticeable, they are less likely to prompt evaluation. Findings highlight the need for improved screening of MSM who report receptive anal sex to will lasix show up on a drug test ensure early syphilis detection and treatment.Cornelisse VJ, Chow EPF, Latimer RL, et al. Getting to the bottom of will lasix show up on a drug test it. Sexual positioning and stage of syphilis at diagnosis, and implications for syphilis screening.

Clin Infect Dis 2020;71(2):318–322 will lasix show up on a drug test. Https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciz802A novel rapid, point-of-care test (POCT) for confirmatory testing of active syphilis The re-emergence of syphilis is a global public health concern especially in resource-limited settings. Current POCTs detect Treponema pallidum (TP) will lasix show up on a drug test total antibodies but do not distinguish between active and past/treated syphilis, resulting in potential overtreatment and contributing to shortages of penicillin. A new, investigational POCT based on the detection of TP-IgA was evaluated against standard laboratory-based serological tests in 458 stored plasma samples from China and 503 venous blood samples from South Africa. Sensitivity and specificity of TP-IgA POCT for identifying will lasix show up on a drug test active syphilis were 96.1% (95% CI.

91.7% to will lasix show up on a drug test 98.5%) and 84.7% (95% CI. 80.1% to 88.6%) in Chinese samples, and 100% (95% CI. 59% to 100%) and will lasix show up on a drug test 99.4% (95% CI. 98.2% to 99.9%) in South African samples, respectively. These preliminary findings suggest that this TP-IgA-based POCT will lasix show up on a drug test meets the WHO target product profile for confirmatory diagnosis of active syphilis.Pham MD, Wise A, Garcia ML, et al.

Improving the coverage and accuracy of syphilis testing. The development of a novel rapid, point-of-care test for confirmatory testing will lasix show up on a drug test of active syphilis and its early evaluation in China and South Africa. EClinicalMedicine 2020;24:100440 will lasix show up on a drug test. Https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eclinm.2020.100440Early antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation and wide coverage reduces population-level HIV s in FranceIn 2013, France implemented the early initiation of ART irrespective of CD4 counts to fast-track progress toward UNAIDS (Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS) 90-90-90 goals (90% of people with HIV diagnosed, 90% on ART, 90% virologically suppressed).1 An analysis of 61 822 HIV-diagnosed people within the national Dat’AIDS prospective cohort study shows that 91.9% of HIV-diagnosed people were receiving ART by 2014 and 90.5% were virologically suppressed by 2013. This was will lasix show up on a drug test accompanied by a 36% and 25% decrease in the number of primary (diagnosed with symptoms of acute HIV) and recent HIV (diagnosed with CD4 cell count ≥500/mm3), respectively, between 2013 and 2017.

These findings on two of three goals support the effectiveness of ‘Treatment as Prevention’ in dramatically reducing HIV incidence at the population level.Le Guillou A, Pugliese P, Raffi F, Cabie A, Cuzin L, Katlama C, et al. Reaching the second and third joint United Nations Programme on Human Immunodeficiency lasix (HIV)/AIDS 90-90-90 targets is accompanied by a dramatic reduction in primary HIV and in recent HIV s in a large French nationwide HIV cohort will lasix show up on a drug test. Clinical Infectious Diseases 2019;71(2):293–300. Https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciz800No evidence of an association between human papillomalasix (HPV) vaccination and infertilityDespite well-established evidence will lasix show up on a drug test of effectiveness and safety, HPV treatment uptake remains below target in many countries, often due to safety concerns. To evaluate claims that HPV vaccination increases female infertility, researchers analysed 2013–2016 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data from 1114 US women aged 20 to 33 years—those young enough to have been offered HPV treatments and old will lasix show up on a drug test enough to have been asked about infertility.

The 8.1% of women who self-reported infertility were neither more nor less likely to have received an HPV treatment. Vaccinated women who had ever been will lasix show up on a drug test married were less likely to report infertility. Findings should engender confidence among healthcare providers, whose recommendation is a key factor in patients’ acceptance of HPV vaccination.Schmuhl N, Mooney KE, Zhang X, Cooney LG, Conway JH, and LoCont NK. No association will lasix show up on a drug test between HPV vaccination and infertility in U.S. Females 18–33 years old.

treatment 2020;38(24):4038–4043 will lasix show up on a drug test. Https://doi.org/10.1016/j.treatment.2020.03.035A pay-it-forward approach to improve uptake of gonorrhoea and chlamydia testingDespite WHO recommendations that MSM receive gonorrhoea and will lasix show up on a drug test chlamydia testing, affordability remains a barrier in many countries. In a randomised trial, researchers tested three incentivising strategies, randomising 301 MSM in MSM-run community-based organisations in Guangzhou and Beijing, China. Gonorrhoea and chlamydia test uptake was 56% in the pay-it-forward arm (free testing and an invitation to donate to a future person’s test), 46% in a pay-what-you-want arm and 18% in the will lasix show up on a drug test standard-cost arm (¥150, €1.2). The estimated difference in test uptake between pay-it-forward and standard cost was 38.4% (95% CI lower bound 28.4%).

Almost 95% of MSM in the pay-it-forward arm will lasix show up on a drug test donated to testing for future participants. The pay-it-forward strategy significantly increased gonorrhoea and chlamydia testing uptake in China and has potential to drive testing in other settings.Yang F, Zhang TP, Tang W, Ong JJ, Alexander M, Forastiere L, Kumar N, Li KT, Zou F, Yang L, Mi G, Wang Y, Huang W, Lee A, Zhu W, Luo D, Vickerman P, Wu D, Yang B, Christakis NA, Tucker JD. Pay-it-forward gonorrhoea and chlamydia testing among men who have sex with men will lasix show up on a drug test in China. A randomised controlled trial will lasix show up on a drug test. Lancet Infect Dis 2020;20(8)976-982.

Https://doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(20)30172-9The Shape of Training review1 and the Future Hospital Commission2 identified the need for a reform of postgraduate medical training in the will lasix show up on a drug test UK for doctors to adapt to changing population and service needs. The focus of postgraduate training needed to move from a ‘time-served’ approach to a competency-based one with doctors developing high-level learning outcomes, capabilities in practice (CiPs). The General Medical Council (GMC) also recommended that all revised curricula from 2020 should include generic professional capabilities (GPCs), including communication, will lasix show up on a drug test leadership, multidisciplinary teamwork and patient safety, which are crucial to safe and effective patient care.Genitourinary medicine (GUM), along with many other physicianly specialities, will adopt a dual training model from August 2022, leading to accreditation in both GUM and general internal medicine (GIM). The GUM curriculum will continue to offer training in the diagnosis, investigation and management of sexually transmitted s and related conditions, contraception, HIV inpatient and outpatient care, management of ….

hypertension medications impact on cisgender gay lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost men and other men who have sex with men (MSM) on a global scaleThe hypertension medications lasix is thought to disproportionately threaten the health of underserved and underinvestigated http://texasworktrucks.net/cheapest-antabuse/ populations. To investigate the impact of lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost hypertension medications transmission mitigation measures on MSM, an international team did a cross-sectional study that included 2732 MSM from 103 countries who responded to a questionnaire distributed through a gay social networking app. Findings suggest that the spread of hypertension medications, and the global response to contain it, has variably disrupted economic, mental health, general health and clinical services among MSM populations, with a greater impact on those living with HIV, racial/ethnic minorities, immigrants, sex workers and socioeconomically disadvantaged groups.

As hypertension medications may deepen health disparities and social lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost inequalities, continued monitoring and creative strategies are needed to mitigate reduction in access to services for MSM with intersecting vulnerabilities.Santos GM, Ackerman B, Rao A, et al. Economic, mental health, HIV prevention and HIV treatment impacts of hypertension medications and the hypertension medications response on a global sample of cisgender gay men and other men who have sex with men. AIDS Beha lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost 2020.

11:1–11.https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-020-02969-0Influence of sexual positioning on syphilis acquisition and its stage at diagnosisIn a lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost retrospective study of MSM in Melbourne, Australia, researchers examined the association between sexual positioning and a diagnosis of primary (n=338) or secondary (n=221) syphilis. Of 247 penile chancres, 244 (98.7%) occurred in MSM who reported versatile or exclusive top sexual positioning. Of 77 anal chancres, 75 (97.4%) occurred in MSM who lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost reported versatile or exclusive bottom sexual positioning.

MSM who practised receptive anal sex were more likely to present with secondary rather than primary syphilis (OR 3.90. P<0.001, adjusted lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost for age, HIV status and condom use). This suggests that because anorectal chancres are less noticeable, they are less likely to prompt evaluation.

Findings highlight the need for improved screening of MSM who report receptive anal sex to lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost ensure early syphilis detection and treatment.Cornelisse VJ, Chow EPF, Latimer RL, et al. Getting to the bottom of lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost it. Sexual positioning and stage of syphilis at diagnosis, and implications for syphilis screening.

Clin Infect Dis lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost 2020;71(2):318–322. Https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciz802A novel rapid, point-of-care test (POCT) for confirmatory testing of active syphilis The re-emergence of syphilis is a global public health concern especially in resource-limited settings. Current POCTs detect Treponema pallidum (TP) total antibodies but do not distinguish lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost between active and past/treated syphilis, resulting in potential overtreatment and contributing to shortages of penicillin.

A new, investigational POCT based on the detection of TP-IgA was evaluated against standard laboratory-based serological tests in 458 stored plasma samples from China and 503 venous blood samples from South Africa. Sensitivity and specificity of TP-IgA POCT for lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost identifying active syphilis were 96.1% (95% CI. 91.7% to 98.5%) lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost and 84.7% (95% CI.

80.1% to 88.6%) in Chinese samples, and 100% (95% CI. 59% to 100%) and lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost 99.4% (95% CI. 98.2% to 99.9%) in South African samples, respectively.

These preliminary findings suggest that this TP-IgA-based POCT meets the lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost WHO target product profile for confirmatory diagnosis of active syphilis.Pham MD, Wise A, Garcia ML, et al. Improving the coverage and accuracy of syphilis testing. The development of a novel rapid, point-of-care test lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost for confirmatory testing of active syphilis and its early evaluation in China and South Africa.

EClinicalMedicine 2020;24:100440 lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost. Https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eclinm.2020.100440Early antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation and wide coverage reduces population-level HIV s in FranceIn 2013, France implemented the early initiation of ART irrespective of CD4 counts to fast-track progress toward UNAIDS (Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS) 90-90-90 goals (90% of people with HIV diagnosed, 90% on ART, 90% virologically suppressed).1 An analysis of 61 822 HIV-diagnosed people within the national Dat’AIDS prospective cohort study shows that 91.9% of HIV-diagnosed people were receiving ART by 2014 and 90.5% were virologically suppressed by 2013. This was accompanied by a 36% and 25% decrease lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost in the number of primary (diagnosed with symptoms of acute HIV) and recent HIV (diagnosed with CD4 cell count ≥500/mm3), respectively, between 2013 and 2017.

These findings on two of three goals support the effectiveness of ‘Treatment as Prevention’ in dramatically reducing HIV incidence at the population level.Le Guillou A, Pugliese P, Raffi F, Cabie A, Cuzin L, Katlama C, et al. Reaching the second and third joint lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost United Nations Programme on Human Immunodeficiency lasix (HIV)/AIDS 90-90-90 targets is accompanied by a dramatic reduction in primary HIV and in recent HIV s in a large French nationwide HIV cohort. Clinical Infectious Diseases 2019;71(2):293–300.

Https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciz800No evidence of an association between human papillomalasix (HPV) vaccination and infertilityDespite well-established lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost evidence of effectiveness and safety, HPV treatment uptake remains below target in many countries, often due to safety concerns. To evaluate claims that HPV vaccination increases female infertility, researchers analysed 2013–2016 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data from 1114 US women aged 20 to 33 years—those young enough to have been offered lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost HPV treatments and old enough to have been asked about infertility. The 8.1% of women who self-reported infertility were neither more nor less likely to have received an HPV treatment.

Vaccinated women who lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost had ever been married were less likely to report infertility. Findings should engender confidence among healthcare providers, whose recommendation is a key factor in patients’ acceptance of HPV vaccination.Schmuhl N, Mooney KE, Zhang X, Cooney LG, Conway JH, and LoCont NK. No association between HPV vaccination lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost and infertility in U.S.

Females 18–33 years old. treatment 2020;38(24):4038–4043 lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost. Https://doi.org/10.1016/j.treatment.2020.03.035A pay-it-forward approach to improve uptake of gonorrhoea and chlamydia testingDespite WHO recommendations that MSM receive gonorrhoea and chlamydia testing, lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost affordability remains a barrier in many countries.

In a randomised trial, researchers tested three incentivising strategies, randomising 301 MSM in MSM-run community-based organisations in Guangzhou and Beijing, China. Gonorrhoea and chlamydia test uptake was 56% in the pay-it-forward arm (free testing lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost and an invitation to donate to a future person’s test), 46% in a pay-what-you-want arm and 18% in the standard-cost arm (¥150, €1.2). The estimated difference in test uptake between pay-it-forward and standard cost was 38.4% (95% CI lower bound 28.4%).

Almost 95% of MSM lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost in the pay-it-forward arm donated to testing for future participants. The pay-it-forward strategy significantly increased gonorrhoea and chlamydia testing uptake in China and has potential to drive testing in other settings.Yang F, Zhang TP, Tang W, Ong JJ, Alexander M, Forastiere L, Kumar N, Li KT, Zou F, Yang L, Mi G, Wang Y, Huang W, Lee A, Zhu W, Luo D, Vickerman P, Wu D, Yang B, Christakis NA, Tucker JD. Pay-it-forward gonorrhoea and chlamydia testing among men who have sex with men lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost in China.

A randomised controlled lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost trial. Lancet Infect Dis 2020;20(8)976-982. Https://doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(20)30172-9The Shape of Training review1 and the Future Hospital Commission2 identified the need for a reform of postgraduate medical training lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost in the UK for doctors to adapt to changing population and service needs.

The focus of postgraduate training needed to move from a ‘time-served’ approach to a competency-based one with doctors developing high-level learning outcomes, capabilities in practice (CiPs). The General Medical Council (GMC) also recommended that all revised curricula from 2020 should include generic professional capabilities (GPCs), including communication, leadership, multidisciplinary teamwork and patient safety, lasix tablets for salelasix for dogs cost which are crucial to safe and effective patient care.Genitourinary medicine (GUM), along with many other physicianly specialities, will adopt a dual training model from August 2022, leading to accreditation in both GUM and general internal medicine (GIM). The GUM curriculum will continue to offer training in the diagnosis, investigation and management of sexually transmitted s and related conditions, contraception, HIV inpatient and outpatient care, management of ….

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